Bulletin
Investor Alert

New York Markets Open in:

Key Words Archives | Email alerts

Sept. 3, 2022, 2:44 p.m. EDT

Biden marks Labor Day with call for Congress to pass PRO Act

new
Watchlist Relevance
LEARN MORE

Want to see how this story relates to your watchlist?

Just add items to create a watchlist now:

  • X
    Uber Technologies Inc. (UBER)
  • X
    Lyft Inc. Cl A (LYFT)
  • X
    DoorDash Inc. Cl A (DASH)

or Cancel Already have a watchlist? Log In

By Levi Sumagaysay

In his Labor Day proclamation on Friday, President Joe Biden called on Congress to “finally” pass the Protect the Right to Organize Act, which would expand labor protections to make it easier for U.S. workers — including app-based gig workers— to organize.

The PRO Act has been stalled for years. It was passed by the U.S. House of Representatives in 2019 and 2021, but failed to be introduced for a vote in the Senate last year. There are few signs that it will happen in this session of Congress as midterm elections approach.

Among other things, the PRO Act could adopt a test that would likely force Uber Tehcnologies Inc. /zigman2/quotes/211348248/composite UBER -1.93% , Lyft Inc. /zigman2/quotes/208999293/composite LYFT -0.86% , DoorDash Inc. /zigman2/quotes/222973991/composite DASH +1.73% and other gig-work companies to classify their drivers and delivery workers as employees instead of independent contractors.

During his presidential campaign, Biden said he would “put a stop to employers intentionally misclassifying their employees as independent contractors.” But his administration has so far failed to do much for gig workers, with activists telling the New York Times in a story published Friday that they’re frustrated about the lack of progress.

The question about whether gig workers should be employees and able to organize isn’t a strictly partisan issue — there are Democratic legislator holdouts against the PRO Act in the Senate . Rep. Henry Cuellar, a Texas Democrat, has introduced a bill that would allow gig companies to continue treating employees as independent contractors , and some Democrats have worked to pass compromise legislation that preserves the gig companies’ business model while promising some labor protections, such as in Washington state . In addition, David Weil, a well-known gig-economy critic and Biden’s nominee to be administrator of the Labor Department’s Wage and Hour Division, was rejected by the Senate, with some Democrats voting against him.

In-depth: We still don’t have a legal definition of ‘gig work,’ but that may be on the way

Biden’s proclamation also lists his administration’s accomplishments on behalf of workers so far, including the recent passage of the CHIPS and Science Act , which is expected to create more jobs in the nation.

“I said from the start that I would be the most pro-worker and pro-union President in American history, and I am keeping that promise,” Biden said.

But some gig workers who took the president’s promises to heart are still waiting.

“We need law,” Nicole Moore, a Los Angeles-based organizer for Rideshare Drivers United, said Friday on Twitter. “Biden needs to align [Democrats] & stop the filibuster. Workers demand progress.”

/zigman2/quotes/211348248/composite
US : U.S.: NYSE
$ 26.40
-0.52 -1.93%
Volume: 21.19M
Dec. 7, 2022 4:00p
P/E Ratio
N/A
Dividend Yield
N/A
Market Cap
$53.69 billion
Rev. per Employee
$991,399
loading...
/zigman2/quotes/208999293/composite
US : U.S.: Nasdaq
$ 10.32
-0.09 -0.86%
Volume: 10.74M
Dec. 7, 2022 4:00p
P/E Ratio
N/A
Dividend Yield
N/A
Market Cap
$3.76 billion
Rev. per Employee
$873,585
loading...
/zigman2/quotes/222973991/composite
US : U.S.: NYSE
$ 53.62
+0.91 +1.73%
Volume: 3.61M
Dec. 7, 2022 4:00p
P/E Ratio
N/A
Dividend Yield
N/A
Market Cap
$20.46 billion
Rev. per Employee
$705,233
loading...

This Story has 0 Comments
Be the first to comment
More News In
Industries

Story Conversation

Commenting FAQs »

Partner Center

Link to MarketWatch's Slice.