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Oct. 20, 2019, 4:07 p.m. EDT

Boris Johnson’s allies confident they have votes for Brexit deal as deadline looms

EU appears likely to approve another extension

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By Associated Press

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“We’re back in court on Monday morning and it will be possible then to secure the court’s assistance if the prime minister has flouted the law and the promises he gave to the court,” she said.

The court action is aimed at keeping Johnson from taking Britain out of the EU without a deal.

Johnson has long declared that he plans to take the U.K. out of the EU on Oct. 31 with or without a divorce deal, and his minister in charge of Brexit again emphasized that stance.

“We are going to leave by Oct. 31st,” Michael Gove insisted Sunday. “We have the means and the ability to do so.”

Gove also said he was holding a special meeting to discuss Operation Yellowhammer, the government’s “no-deal” planning apparatus, to make sure Britain is ready for an Oct. 31 departure. The government’s own analysts have warned an abrupt break with the EU could lead to recession, massive delays at British ports, and shortages in food and prescription medicine.

The EU’s chief Brexit negotiator, Michel Barnier, said Tusk would consult with other leaders “in the next days” about Johnson’s request, but most signs indicate the EU would prefer an extension to an abrupt no-deal Brexit.

Finnish Prime Minister Antti Rinne, whose country holds the European Union’s rotating presidency, said Sunday “it makes sense to allow extra time.”

While Johnson’s Conservatives are focused on getting more votes, the opposition Labour Party was calling for a second referendum on the whole question of leaving the EU.

Labour’s Brexit spokesman Keir Starmer said it is “inevitable” that lawmakers opposed to Brexit will put forward an amendment seeking a second referendum — something strongly opposed by Johnson and his government.

“Whether it’s this deal or any future deal, it’s got to go back so the public can say, ‘Do you want to leave on these terms?’” Starmer said. “If so, then we do. If not, we remain.”

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