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Nov. 9, 2020, 6:40 a.m. EST

Dr. Zeke Emanuel says this is what it will take to fully reopen the U.S.

Emanuel, an adviser to Joe Biden and vice provost for global initiatives at the University of Pennsylvania, says Americans have a tough 12 months ahead.

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By Jaimy Lee


MarketWatch photo illustration/Getty Images, iStockphoto
Oncologist Ezekiel ‘Zeke’ Emanuel is an adviser to the Biden campaign and served as a special health adviser to the Obama White House, where Emanuel’s brother Rahm was chief of staff before becoming mayor of Chicago. Another brother, Hollywood talent agency executive Ari, makes a cameo in this interview.

This interview is part of a series of conversations MarketWatch is conducting with some of the leading voices in the U.S. on the COVID-19 pandemic.

Even within one-party families, there is debate about how long it will take to get the U.S. out of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Dr. Ezekiel Emanuel, an oncologist, adviser to Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden and vice provost for global initiatives at the University of Pennsylvania, says Americans have a tough 12 months ahead. On the other hand, his brother, Ari Emanuel, the Hollywood agent and CEO of entertainment agency Endeavor, predicts things will get better by July as long as a COVID-19 vaccine is authorized or approved in December.

“It’ll be closer to November, closer toward the end” of 2021, Zeke Emanuel told MarketWatch. “But it’ll probably be enough to begin opening colleges and universities [and] schools, again depending on how we distribute this thing and how effective we can be on that.”

For now, however, the focus is reducing transmission of the virus at a time when we are all starting to spend more time indoors and as pandemic fatigue is setting in. “There are four things that increase transmission: indoors, crowds, long periods of time, and then coughing, sneezing, singing [and] yelling,” he said. “If you put a group of people indoors, [and] one of whom is infected, it’s predictable what’s going to happen.”

MarketWatch: You published research that found the U.S. has had more deaths from COVID-19 than other countries and one of the highest per capita death rates worldwide. Why do you think we’re seeing this?

Dr. Zeke Emanuel: It’s a concatenation of problems. We never had an efficient testing regime so we could quickly identify people, isolate them and prevent spread. We didn’t have effective implementation uniformly across the country, with the public health measures: physical distancing, face-mask wearing, limiting crowds, which I think has gotten too little attention and needs more attention. If the main spread is by “superspreaders,” limiting crowds is critical to that. Hand hygiene. [At the beginning of the pandemic], we all focused on the fomites, the packages coming from Amazon and washing them down and all that nonsense. As it turns out, that’s probably totally irrelevant.

Then we had the problem of states saying, ‘Well, we don’t have it here,’ and not understanding epidemiology. You’ve got a small number of cases, but that means it’ll explode. We’ve seen that. Why is it all up and down the Midwest, whether it’s Wisconsin or Missouri or South Dakota or North Dakota? Because they were cavalier, saying: “We don’t have it here.” You have 500,000 people coming together for the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally. The president, frankly — there’s a lack of leadership and getting everyone together.

Coronavirus daily update: Trump lashes out at North Carolina rally over media focus on ongoing public health crisis

If you look at Taiwan or New Zealand, or even Italy, eight, 10, 12 weeks of really serious pain — limiting social activities, limiting groups — you get the number of new cases a day down to one per 100,000. In the United States, that means 3,000 new cases [or] 2,000 new cases a day, down from what we’re doing at 60,000. Then we can be a lot more free and open. The chance of spreading is low. Schools can open. Lots of things happen when you’re about 3,000 cases [a day], as opposed to 60,000 or 40,000 cases a day.

We just never had the staying power to do that. We wrote an op-ed in the Philadelphia Inquirer about the marshmallow experiment. [The marshmallow experiment was a study conducted in the early 1970s that tested the difference in children who opted for an immediate reward, compared with the children who were able to wait and get twice the reward.] Successful kids don’t eat the marshmallow right away. If America was a successful kid, we wouldn’t have rushed to open up four weeks after we see good results. We would have waited the full eight to 12 weeks to get down to low, low numbers nationwide. And that’s what we need to do.

MarketWatch: Were more stringent lockdowns the primary reason that countries like Taiwan and New Zealand have been able to manage the virus so much better? Or are there other factors?

Emanuel: It’s about bringing cases down in the initial lockdown. It’s then opening up and not rushing to open up indoor dining or indoor bars or gyms. [It’s] opening up outside, managing the cases, putting in place the testing routine, so that when you have an outbreak, you limit it very, very quickly. We’ve seen this capacity in South Korea and Taiwan. Wearing face masks limits the spread. Limiting the number of people together limits the spread. That doesn’t mean you can’t gather with people, but it’s a small number. Keeping your social network under 20 seems to be a critical threshold.

MarketWatch: That is interesting. Given the position that the U.S. is in now, how are you thinking about this fall and winter?

Emanuel: The biggest concern is we’re moving indoors. There are four things that increase transmission: indoors, crowds, long periods of time, and then coughing, sneezing, singing [and] yelling. And we’re going to move indoors, and many of the places we’re going in — houses, etc. — don’t have great air handling systems. If you put a group of people indoors, one of whom is infected, it’s predictable what’s going to happen. The last I looked, We’re at 220,000 [COVID-19 deaths] now. [The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Tuesday that more than 285,000 Americans have died than expected in 2020.]

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