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Federal Emergency Management Agency

1:12 a.m. Dec. 4, 2020 - By Andrew Keshner
From jobs to child care: How this second surge in COVID-19 can damage your finances — as well as your health More people were having trouble getting enough food on the table in early November compared to five weeks earlierMore people were having trouble getting enough food on the table in early November compared to five weeks earlier.
4:16 a.m. Oct. 22, 2020 - By Andrew Keshner
‘I’m terrified, frankly’: These people are depending on another stimulus bill to stay afloat Without more federal pandemic relief, one person said, ‘Things are going to get a lot harder for a lot longer’Without more stimulus money, one person said, ‘things are going to get a lot harder for a lot longer.’
3:48 a.m. Sept. 10, 2020 - Associated Press
Trump’s acting homeland secretary defends force deployment to Portland and places civil unrest among top threats to U.S. ‘State of the Homeland’ speech spells out the department’s priorities under Chad Wolf’s directionThe acting head of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Chad Wolf, on Wednesday defended his response to protests in Portland, Ore., amid criticism that the agency overstepped its authority with a heavy-handed deployment that reflected the law-and-order re-election campaign of President Donald Trump
6:42 a.m. Sept. 2, 2020 - By Elisabeth Buchwald
Losing the extra $600 unemployment benefit may not have stopped Americans from spending money, J.P. Morgan credit card data show ‘We see little sign that the benefit expiration has marked a major turning point for the overall economy,’ one J.P. Morgan economist said‘We see little sign that the benefit expiration has marked a major turning point for the overall economy,’ one J.P. Morgan economist said.
10:38 a.m. Aug. 28, 2020 - By Jacob Passy
As Louisiana recovers from Hurricane Laura, here’s what homeowners should know about the fine print in their insurance policies Standard homeowner’s insurance doesn’t cover damage from some types of natural disastersStandard homeowner’s insurance doesn’t cover damage from some types of natural disasters.
7:03 p.m. May 20, 2020 - Associated Press
Michigan floodwaters displace thousands, threaten Superfund site Owner of Edenville Dam, which breached, had been cited for non-compliance issues Floodwaters surging through Central Michigan on Wednesday were mixing with containment ponds at a Dow Chemical Co. plant and could displace sediment from a downstream Superfund site, though the company said there was no risk to people or the environment.
8:52 p.m. May 16, 2020 - Associated Press
Pompeo firing of State Department inspector general triggers probe by House Democrats Democrats demanded on Saturday that the White House hand over all records related to President Donald Trump’s latest firing of a federal watchdog, this time at the State Department, and they suggested Secretary of State Mike Pompeo was responsible, in what “may be an illegal act of retaliation.”
7:36 a.m. May 9, 2020 - By Ciara Linnane
Coronavirus update: U.S. economy sheds record-setting 20.5 million jobs and New York child dies of condition linked to virus Uber posts almost $3 billion loss in latest quarter and Roku says it saw a spike in ad cancellations The U.S. Labor Department said the pandemic cost 20.5 million jobs in April, pushing the unemployment rate to a post–World War II high and deepening the economic crisis, while in New York, a child died of a rare condition linked to the virus.
6:38 a.m. April 29, 2020 - Associated Press
Battered by floods, U.S. river communities try new remedies Floods in the Missouri, Mississippi and Arkansas river basins caused $20 billion in damage in 2019, the second-wettest year on recordHollywood Beach Road was once such prime real estate that the neighborhood had its own airstrip, enabling well-heeled residents to zip back and forth between homes in nearby St. Louis and weekend cottages on the Meramec River in suburban Arnold, Missouri.
4:14 a.m. April 29, 2020 - By Ciara Linnane
Honeywell to make hand sanitizer for frontline workers at plants in Michigan and Germany Defense company Honeywell International Inc. said Wednesday it is shifting manufacturing operations at two chemical facilities to produce hand sanitizer for government agencies suffering shortages during the coronavirus pandemic. Sites in Muskegon, Michigan and Seelze, Germany will temporarily change production lines over the next two months. The Muskegon plant makes high-purity solvents and blends with more than 1,500 products used in high-end applications such as DNA and RNA synthesis, environmental analysis, precision cleaning, pharmaceutical testing and various other laboratory applications, said Honeywell The plant has begun production of hand sanitizer that it will donate to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). The German plant produces more than 500 products used for laboratory research and testing, inorganic fine chemicals for agriculture and automotive industries, electronic chemicals used in semiconductors, and microchips and authentication technologies used in high security and brand protection applications, including personal protection equipment, or PPE, which is much in demand among health care workers and other frontline workers. The plant has already sent one batch of industrial hand sanitizer to the Saxony Ministry of Health, Social Affairs and Equality, which will distribute it to local hospitals and factories. Honeywell is already making N95 masks from production lines in Arizona and Rhode Island to help with COVID-19 workers. Shares rose 2% in premarket trade, but are down 19% year-to-date, while the S&P 500 has fallen 11%.
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