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Aug. 20, 2012, 1:40 p.m. EDT

Canada’s housing market frothy, but not a bubble

Tighter regulation, healthier banking sector insulate housing market

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By Ronald D. Orol, MarketWatch

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Hogue noted that the largest chunk of fixed-rate mortgages are 5-year fixed-rate loans and that in recent months he has seen a shift in Canadian borrowers moving from floating to 5-year fixed-rate mortgages in response to bank promotions and in anticipation of higher interest rates down the road.

Nevertheless, borrower interest-rate risk is there. Craig Alexander, chief economist at Toronto-Dominion Bank /zigman2/quotes/202133558/composite TD +5.00%  in Toronto, noted that the percentage of mortgages in arrears is well below 1%, with significantly fewer foreclosures. However, he argued that if the Bank of Canada were to hike interest rates by two percentage points about 8% of Canadian households would have more than 40% of their income servicing debt.

“Statistically when more than 40% of income is going to personal debt that is when you have real problems, so about 8% of Canadians would find managing their debt level is extremely difficult, not insignificant, but not a U.S.-level problem,” Alexander said.

Many economists following the Canadian housing market agree that, barring external shocks such as a major U.S. recession or an uncontained European crisis, the Bank of Canada will raise interest rates gradually starting in 2013. Backing those assertions, Bank of Canada Gov. Mark Carney appeared upbeat earlier this month about the economy. He said, “We had been growing above trend, and to the extent to which we continue to grow above trend, we may withdraw some of that monetary-policy stimulus.”

However, some analysts note that Carney may delay rate hikes after unemployment rose to 7.3% from 7.2% in June.

Nevertheless, Hogue said he doesn’t see the jobs market as hindering the housing market. He added that the deterioration in affordability so far has been less during this housing boom than the period around the late 1980s and early 1990s in Canada (Canada had a recession in 1990-91) and that he believes it is unlikely that affordability will deteriorate so much more that it reaches a comparable position.

He said that RBC’s base economic forecast for Canada in the period ahead calls for sustained growth in economy, rising employment and a much more supportive environment for the housing market than in the early 1990s.

“It’s not that home prices are not high in Canada, but borrowing costs are still manageable,” he said.

Analysts also disputed notions that Canada’s condo market, particularly in Toronto, is in a dangerous bubble. Kennedy said Canada’s condo market has traditionally fluctuated more than the single-family market, but that restrictions limiting how many condos an investor can buy and requirements that a substantial segment of a condo complex be sold before financing can be provided for construction have contributed to reducing the likelihood of a dangerous condo bust.

“This helps prevent the kind of situation we have seen in Florida and California where whole developments that the banks financed are empty, without buyers,” Kennedy said

Nevertheless, credit rating agency Standard & Poor’s warned in July that five Canadian banks are vulnerable, dropping its outlook for them to “negative” from “stable.”

The warning hit three of the largest banks in Canada, Royal Bank of Canada /zigman2/quotes/200638870/delayed CA:RY +1.91% , Toronto-Dominion Bank /zigman2/quotes/202133558/composite TD +5.00%   /zigman2/quotes/209283160/delayed CA:TD +4.91%  and Bank of Nova Scotia /zigman2/quotes/207954556/composite BNS +2.72%  as well as two smaller competitors, Laurentian Bank of Canada /zigman2/quotes/209831927/delayed CA:LB +2.14%  and National Bank of Canada /zigman2/quotes/205584400/delayed CA:NA +0.75% . S&P noted hikes in consumer debt, elevated housing prices and a worsening outlook for the global economy as key risks and reasons for the outlook revision.

External shocks

External shocks could still change the analysis. Kennedy acknowledged that there are some low-probability events that could hurt Canada’s housing market and economy. Domestically, a recession or a dramatic rise in inflation that would require a hike in interest rates could trigger an increase in borrower defaults. However, she added that neither of these scenarios is in the base case scenario for economists following Canada’s economy.

Paul Ferley, assistant chief economist at RBC, said a severe U.S. recession would cause Canadian unemployment to rise at the same time that it hits incomes.

“A major U.S. recession at a time when consumer debt levels are fairly high just becomes unbearable and you would get a correction in the housing market,” Ferley said. “Then interest rates would get cut.”

Externally, Kennedy said that a contained euro zone problem would not be a risk because Canada doesn’t depend directly on exports to Europe while Canadian financial institutions have said they don’t have a lot of exposure to Europe.

“But if there was contagion through the global economy and financial system, particularly affecting the U.S., that would be a concern,” she said.

Kennedy added that if there is a U.S. and Europe problem at the same time that also depresses demand from emerging economies, including China, for commodities, then there is a threat to Canada.

“If the U.S. is struggling because of fiscal problems but the emerging world is growing fast and doing fine because they are managing to tap into internal demand, Canada is fine,” she said.

/zigman2/quotes/202133558/composite
US : U.S.: NYSE
$ 75.32
+3.59 +5.00%
Volume: 2.56M
Dec. 2, 2021 4:00p
P/E Ratio
11.35
Dividend Yield
3.34%
Market Cap
$131.22 billion
Rev. per Employee
N/A
loading...
/zigman2/quotes/200638870/delayed
CA : Canada: Toronto
$ 128.14
+2.40 +1.91%
Volume: 4.88M
Dec. 2, 2021 5:00p
P/E Ratio
11.58
Dividend Yield
3.75%
Market Cap
$179.10 billion
Rev. per Employee
$699,302
loading...
/zigman2/quotes/202133558/composite
US : U.S.: NYSE
$ 75.32
+3.59 +5.00%
Volume: 2.56M
Dec. 2, 2021 4:00p
P/E Ratio
11.35
Dividend Yield
3.34%
Market Cap
$131.22 billion
Rev. per Employee
N/A
loading...
/zigman2/quotes/209283160/delayed
CA : Canada: Toronto
$ 96.50
+4.52 +4.91%
Volume: 6.05M
Dec. 2, 2021 5:00p
P/E Ratio
11.38
Dividend Yield
3.27%
Market Cap
$167.28 billion
Rev. per Employee
N/A
loading...
/zigman2/quotes/207954556/composite
US : U.S.: NYSE
$ 66.10
+1.75 +2.72%
Volume: 2.43M
Dec. 2, 2021 4:00p
P/E Ratio
10.78
Dividend Yield
4.73%
Market Cap
$78.64 billion
Rev. per Employee
$338,943
loading...
/zigman2/quotes/209831927/delayed
CA : Canada: Toronto
$ 37.75
+0.79 +2.14%
Volume: 198,186
Dec. 2, 2021 5:00p
P/E Ratio
8.95
Dividend Yield
4.24%
Market Cap
$1.61 billion
Rev. per Employee
$592,790
loading...
/zigman2/quotes/205584400/delayed
CA : Canada: Toronto
$ 96.56
+0.72 +0.75%
Volume: 1.75M
Dec. 2, 2021 5:00p
P/E Ratio
10.78
Dividend Yield
2.94%
Market Cap
$32.28 billion
Rev. per Employee
$434,268
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Ronald D. Orol is a MarketWatch reporter, based in Washington.

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