Bulletin
Investor Alert

New York Markets Open in:

Topics

Jones

8:17 a.m. Oct. 7, 2021 - By Victor Reklaitis
Schumer: Senate could act 'as soon as today' on lifting debt limit after agreement reachedSenate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer said in a brief floor speech on Thursday morning that top Democrats and Republicans in the chamber had "reached agreement to extend the debt ceiling through early December, and it's our hope that we can get this done as soon as today." Democratic senators had signaled late Wednesday that their party was Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell's offer of a short-term lift to the federal borrowing limit.
10:27 a.m. Oct. 6, 2021 - By Victor Reklaitis
McConnell to offer proposal to Schumer for ending debt-limit standoffSenate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell plans to outline a proposal that he's prepared to discuss with Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer "that's going to give us a way out of the woods" in the debt-limit standoff, Republican Sen. Lisa Murkowski of Alaska told reporters on Wednesday, according to multiple published reports. McConnell, the Kentucky Republican, in a floor speech earlier Wednesday offered to limit Republican delaying maneuvers if Senate Democrats agree to address the debt ceiling through a process known as budget reconciliation.
10:46 a.m. Sept. 30, 2021 - By Greg Robb
Yellen throws cold water on trillion-dollar coin solution for debt ceiling stalemateTreasury Secretary Janet Yellen on Thursday said "the only way" to avoid a default on the U.S. debt is for Congress to pass legislation to raise the debt ceiling, throwing cold water on the radical idea of minting a trillion-dollar coin to get around the politically difficult vote. Rep. William Timmons, a Republican of South Carolina, asked Yellen to comment on the idea. He said Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi "gave oxygen" to the proposed trillion-dollar coin when she mentioned it during a press conference on Wednesday. Timmons asked Yellen to "please tell me this is not a legitimate policy proposal." In response, Yellen said: "I believe that the only way to handle the debt ceiling is for Congress to raise it and show the world, financial markets and the public that we're a country that will pay our bills." However, in a question from Rep. Sean Casten, Democrat from Illinois, Yellen said she would support legislation to remove the requirement for a vote on the debt limit by Congress.
8:50 a.m. Sept. 30, 2021 - By Greg Robb
Yellen throws cold water on trillion-dollar coin solution for debt ceiling stalemateTreasury Secretary Janet Yellen on Thursday said "the only way" to avoid a default on the U.S. debt is for Congress to pass legislation to raise the debt ceiling, throwing cold water on the radical idea of minting a trillion-dollar coin to get around the politically difficult vote. Rep. William Timmons, a Republican of South Carolina, asked Yellen to comment on the idea. He said Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi "gave oxygen" to the proposed trillion-dollar coin when she mentioned it during a press conference on Wednesday. Timmons asked Yellen to "please tell me this is not a legitimate policy proposal." In response, Yellen said: "I believe that the only way to handle the debt ceiling is for Congress to raise it and show the world, financial markets and the public that we're a country that will pay our bills."
8:49 a.m. Sept. 30, 2021 - By Victor Reklaitis
Manchin wants any revenue over $1.5 trillion from reconciliation bill to go to reducing deficit: reportDemocratic Sen. Joe Manchin of West Virginia, who wants to his party's $3.5 trillion spending plan cut by more than half, has argued that any revenue from it that exceeds $1.5 trillion should go toward reducing the U.S. deficit, according to a on Thursday, citing a document that he reportedly has been distributing among colleagues. The document also spells out other stances taken by Manchin that previously have been reported, such as his proposal to raise the corporate tax rate to 25% and his view that the Federal Reserve should pull back on certain stimulus measures. Democrats need the support of Manchin in order to advance legislation through a process known as budget reconciliation because the Senate is split 50-50.
6:38 a.m. Sept. 30, 2021 - By Greg Robb
Senior House Republican defends Powell from Warren's criticismRep. Patrick McHenry, the ranking Republican on the House Financial Services Committee, on Thursday defended Fed Chairman Jerome Powell from criticism made earlier in the week by Sen. Elizabeth Warren, the Democrat from Massachusetts. Warren said Powell was a "dangerous man" because he had deregulated the biggest banks over his four-year term and said she would not vote to give him a second term if he were nominated for a second term. McHenry said this criticism was "reckless and unmoored from reality." McHenry said Powell's "decisive action" prevented the worst of the coronavirus pandemic crisis.
11:04 a.m. Sept. 29, 2021 - By Victor Reklaitis
Without action on debt limit, U.S. likely to run out of cash near end of October or start of November: CBOThe said the U.S. Treasury Department will most likely run out of cash near the end of October or the beginning of November if the federal borrowing limit remains unchanged by Congress. That's later than an given on Tuesday by Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen.
6:51 a.m. Sept. 28, 2021 - By Greg Robb
Powell: Some bottlenecks sparking inflation have gotten worseFederal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell said Tuesday that some of the supply-side bottlenecks behind the surge in inflation have "gotten worse." "Look at the car companies, look at the ships with the anchors down outside of Los Angeles. This is really a mismatch between demand and supply, we need those supply blockages to alleviate, to abate, before inflation can come down," Powell said, during a Senate Banking Committee hearing. The Fed projects that inflation will come down and most of the gains in inflation are coming from a very small category of items, Powell added.
5:26 a.m. Sept. 28, 2021 - By Greg Robb
Congress must raise or suspend debt limit by Oct. 18, Yellen saysTreasury Secretary Janet Yellen said Tuesday that the Treasury Department is likely to exhaust extraordinary measures to keep from defaulting on its debt if Congress has not acted to raise or suspend the debt limit by Oct. 18. "At that point, we expect Treasury would be left with very limited resources that would be depleted quickly," Yellen said in an update sent to Congressional leaders. Yellen had earlier estimated that the extraordinary measures would last until mid-October. On Monday, Senate Republicans blocked legislation that would have suspended the debt limit.
12:13 p.m. Sept. 27, 2021 - By Victor Reklaitis
Dallas Fed's Kaplan, under scrutiny for 2020 trading activity, to retire Oct. 8The Dallas Federal Reserve announced Monday that its president, Rob Kaplan, will retire from the regional bank on Oct. 8. The departure comes after Kaplan and Boston Fed President Eric Rosengren of individual securities. that "the recent focus on my financial disclosure risks becoming a distraction" to the U.S. central bank's work. earlier Monday that he will retire on Thursday.
4:47 a.m. Sept. 27, 2021 - By Greg Robb
Fed's Rosengren, under scrutiny for 2020 trading activity, to retire on Sept. 30Boston Fed President Eric Rosengren announced Monday he will retire on Sept 30. In a statement, Rosengren said he moved up his long-planned retirement by nine months because of health concerns. Rosengren would have had to retire next June under Fed rules. Rosengren has been criticized for actively trading in real-estate investment trusts in 2020 while the Fed was taking extraordinary steps to keep financial markets stable during the pandemic. Reformers, like the group Better Markets, had called for Rosengren to resign.
8:47 a.m. Sept. 22, 2021 - By Victor Reklaitis
McConnell to Democrats: 'Don't play Russian roulette with our economy. Step up and raise the debt ceiling.'Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell on Wednesday reiterated his view that e to raise the federal borrowing limit, since President Joe Biden's party has pursued massive spending without Republican support. "My advice to this Democratic government -- the president, the House and the Senate: Don't play Russian roulette with our economy. Step up and raise the debt ceiling to cover all that you've been engaged in all year long," said McConnell, a Kentucky Republican, during a news conference. Democratic lawmakers have rejected McConnell's argument, saying that is about addressing spending during the Republican Trump administration.
2:19 a.m. Sept. 20, 2021 - By Tomi Kilgore
All 30 Dow stocks fall as Evergrande default fears spark selloff Shares of all 30 components of the Dow Jones Industrial Average are trading lower in Monday's premarket, led by financials, as part of sparked by concerns over the collateral damage from the potential default by . Among the biggest early decliners, shares of American Express Co. sank 2.9%, Goldman Sachs Group Inc. gave up 2.5% and J.P. Morgan Chase & Co. shed 2.5%. The most active Dow stock was Apple Inc.'s , which slid 1.2%. The best performer was Traveler Companies Inc.'s stock , which slipped just 0.1%. Meanwhile, Dow futures tumbled 540 points, or 1.6%.
9:42 a.m. Sept. 16, 2021 - By Tomi Kilgore
American Express stock rises to pace the Dow's gainers after BofA backs away from bearish stanceShares of American Express Co. rose 0.8% in afternoon trading Thursday, enough to pace the Dow Jones Industrial Average gainers, after BofA Securities analyst Mihir Bhatia backed away from from his bearish view on the charge card and travel-related services company, citing a now "balanced" risk-reward profile. The stock has lost 4.6% since the end of July, while the SPDR Financial Select Sector ETF has gained 3.4% and the S&P 500 has tacked on 1.4%. Bhatia attributed the stock's recent underperformance to fears that the recent spike in COVID-19 cases would slow the economic recovery and hurt AmEx's billings. "However, at a conference appearance this week, [AmEX] noted that [quarter-to-date] total billings are up 3% vs. 2019 levels (an acceleration from -2% in 2Q)," Bhatia wrote in a research note. "This was better than feared." He added that while a slower recovery and higher corporate taxes are remain near-term risks, the company is likely to also benefit from increased travel spending, particularly by large businesses, in 2022.
11:32 a.m. Sept. 14, 2021 - By Victor Reklaitis
McConnell reiterates that Democrats must raise debt limit on their ownSenate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell on Tuesday repeated his view that Democratic lawmakers ought to to raise the federal borrowing limit. "Let me be crystal clear about this: Republicans are united in opposition to raising the debt ceiling, not because it doesn't need to be done," the Kentucky Republican told reporters. He said Democrats should do it on their own because he has "never seen such an effort to expand the reach of the federal government like we've been confronted with this year," so if Democrats "want to do all of this on a partisan basis, they have the ability and the responsibility to ensure that the federal government not default."
7:28 a.m. Sept. 13, 2021 - By Victor Reklaitis
House Democrats propose hike in capital-gains tax to 25% for high earners as of MondayThe Democratic-run House Ways and Means Committee on Monday released and a that propose an increase in the capital-gains tax rate for high-income individuals to 25%. The preexisting rate of 20% would apply to transactions made before Monday, according to their legislative text and summary. That's after President Joe Biden's proposed budget in May backed a and assumed the increase took effect in late April.
5:37 a.m. Sept. 10, 2021 - By Victor Reklaitis
2% tax on stock buybacks proposed by 2 Democratic senatorsDemocratic Sens. Sherrod Brown of Ohio and Ron Wyden of Oregon on Friday rolled out new legislation that aims to assess a 2% excise tax on the amount spent by a publicly-traded company on buying back its own stock. "Stock buybacks are currently heavily favored by the tax code, despite their skewed benefits for the very top and potential for insider game-playing. Our bill simply ends this preferential treatment and encourages mega-corporations to invest in their workers," said Wyden, who chairs the Senate Finance Committee, in a statement. said Senate Democrats were considering a range of other potential tax hikes to fund their $3.5 trillion spending plan, from levies on stock buybacks and "virgin plastics" to a "CEO pay disparity" tax.
6:47 a.m. Sept. 8, 2021 - By Victor Reklaitis
Yellen urges Congress to lift debt limit, warns cash, extraordinary measures likely to run out in OctoberTreasury Secretary Janet Yellen on Wednesday again urged Congress to "protect the full faith and credit of the United States by acting as soon as possible" to suspend or . In , Yellen said Treasury estimates it's most likely that "cash and extraordinary measures will be exhausted during the month of October," and a delay "would likely cause irreparable damage to the U.S. economy and global financial markets."
10:36 a.m. Aug. 27, 2021 - By Greg Robb
Fed's Clarida, echoing Powell, backs start of taper this yearThe number two official at the Federal Reserve on Friday backed the start of a taper of bond purchases later this year, in comments that largely echoed Fed Chairman Jerome Powell's Jackson Hole speech. In an interview with CNBC, Fed Vice Chairman Richard Clarida said he expects the trend of "robust" job gains seen this summer to continue and "if that happens I would also support commencing reduction in the pace of our purchases later this year." The economy has added an average of over 800,000 per month over the last three months. Clarida said it wouldn't take the strong pace of 800,000 jobs per month for the Fed to reach its benchmark for tapering of "substantial" progress in the labor markets. "I don't think it takes 800,000 per month, but robust gains," Clarida said.
10:35 a.m. Aug. 27, 2021 - By Greg Robb
Fed's Mester says exactly what month taper starts is not a big deal Cleveland Fed President Loretta Mester said Friday that the exact month of 2021 that the Fed starts to taper its bond purchases is of little consequence for the economy. "Whether it is September [announcement] to start in November or November to start in December, I don't think that is going to make a material difference to the economy," Mester said, in an interview on Bloomberg Television. Fed officials are "all sort of in the ballpark" of tapering some time this year with the view of completing the process in the middle of next year, Mester said. "The bottom line is that we've met the criteria we put out or we're very close to it," Mester said. In the wake of Fed Chairman Jerome Powell's speech in Jackson Hole, market participants and economists have begun to debate whether the Fed would lay out its strategy in September or November. Mester, who earlier Friday said she would be comfortable with a September announcement, said Fed officials will use its next meeting on Sept. 21-22 to "lay out some of our own thinking about the pace and the timing." Officials will continue to watch the downside risk from the coronavirus delta variant, she added. Mester will be a voting member of the Fed's interest rate committee next year.
4:46 a.m. Aug. 27, 2021 - By Greg Robb
Fed's Harker backs starting taper 'sooner rather than later'Philadelphia Fed President Patrick Harker said he wanted to move toward tapering asset purchases "sooner rather than later." In an interview with CNBC, Harker said that he didn't think the $120 billion per month of asset purchases were "doing a whole lot right now." The economy is being held back by supply issues that lower interest rates can't solve, he said. Harker said he was still supportive of "moving the taper along" despite potential damage to the economy from the coronavirus delta variant. The Philadelphia Fed president said the rapid acceleration in inflation seen this year "may not be so transitory." Contacts in his district have said supply chain disruptions facing the home-building sector "won't be solved anytime soon," he said. Harker won't be a voting member of the Fed's interest-rate committee until 2023.
4:11 a.m. Aug. 27, 2021 - By Greg Robb
Fed's Bostic says job data 'in coming months' will decide when to start taperingThe U.S. economy is "very close" to the substantial progress benchmark needed to start tapering its asset purchases but "a lot depends on what happens in the next couple of months," said Atlanta Fed President Raphael Bostic on Friday. In an interview on CNBC, Bostic said he was focused on conditions in the labor market. If job gains continue at the pace seen earlier in the summer, then that will satisfy the conditions for making substantial progress, he said. This suggests Bostic may want to wait until the November meeting to announce the slowing down of purchases. More hawkish Fed officials are pressing for a September announcement. Once the tapering program started, Bostic said he wanted to reduce the purchases "as quickly as possible." The Fed is buying $120 billion per month of Treasurys and mortgage-backed securities to hold down long-term interest rates. Bostic said he didn't think the tapering would upset financial markets. Fed Chairman Jerome Powell will speak about the economy at 10 a.m. Eastern.
7:06 a.m. Aug. 26, 2021 - By Greg Robb
Dallas Fed's Kaplan, seeing 'resiliency' in face of delta, sticks with call for September taper announcementDallas Fed President Rob Kaplan on Thursday said he will press his colleagues to agree to announce a plan to start "tapering" or slowing down asset purchases in September, and to then launch the program in October or November. Kaplan had made headlines last week when he said the spread of the coronavirus delta variant might cause him to rethink this aggressive timetable. In an interview with CNBC, Kaplan said he has reviewed the latest data and wants to go ahead with his initial plan for the September taper announcement because Americans are adjusting to the delta variant. "What we're seeing is consumers and businesses are just becoming more adaptable," Kaplan said. "We're seeing resiliency." Stocks were lower on Thursday with the Dow Jones Industrial Average [s:DJIA] down almost 100 points in late morning trading.
9:30 a.m. Aug. 11, 2021 - By Greg Robb
Fed's Kaplan says central bank should announce taper plans in SeptemberDallas Fed President Rob Kaplan said Wednesday that he will press his colleagues at the central bank to announce a plan to taper bond purchases at its next meeting in late September. In an interview on CNBC, Kaplan said he wanted the slow down in purchases to start in October and last until June. Kaplan has been pressing his colleagues to start to pull back on its $120 billion in monthly bond and mortgage-related securities since late April. Asked if he had a lot of support from his colleagues for his position, Kaplan said there was a "range of views" but the committee is in a much better place than it was two months. Kaplan said the asset purchases don't help the economy now because the trouble is with the supply of goods and workers. Asset purchases work best to spur demand, he said. Kaplan ducked questions about whether his timetable meant that the Fed will raise interest rates as soon as next year. He said he was "divorcing" his views on tapering from his decisions on when to hike rates.
7:39 a.m. Aug. 9, 2021 - By Victor Reklaitis
U.S. rolls out new sanctions against BelarusThe Biden administration on Monday announced more sanctions against Belarus on the one-year anniversary of the Eastern European nation's . The that President Joe Biden signed an executive order targeting Alexander Lukashenko and his regime "for their ongoing assault against the democratic aspirations and human rights of the Belarusian people, transnational repression and abuse, affronts to international norms, and corruption." The sanctions are aimed at entities that include potash producer Belaruskali OAO, the Belarusian National Olympic Committee and "prominent businesspeople who support the Lukashenka regime as well as fifteen companies with which they are affiliated," the statement also said.
12:11 p.m. Aug. 6, 2021 - By Victor Reklaitis
Biden administration extends pause on student-loan payments until Jan. 31The Biden administration on Friday announced what it described as "a final extension" of the pause on student-loan repayments, interest and collections until Jan. 31. The Department of Education said in a news release that the "additional time and a definitive end date will allow borrowers to plan for the resumption of payments and reduce the risk of delinquency and defaults after restart." An earlier pause on student-loan payments .
3:44 a.m. July 13, 2021 - By Tomi Kilgore
Goldman reports big profit and revenue beats, boosts dividend by 60%Shares of Goldman Sachs Group Inc. edged up 0.3% in premarket trading Tuesday, after the bank reported big second-quarter profit and revenue beats, as weakness in the global markets business was offset by strength in asset management, investment banking and consumer and wealth management, and boosted its dividend by 60%. Net income soared to $5.35 billion, or $15.02 a share, from $197 million, or 53 cents a share, in the year-ago period. The FactSet consensus for earnings per share was $10.25. Total revenue rose 15.7% to $15.39 billion, well above the FactSet consensus of $12.31 billion, as market-making revenue fell 43.4% to $3.27 billion while investment banking revenue grew 26.2% to $3.45 billion and investment management revenue increased 16.5% to $1.91 billion. Equity underwriting revenue jumped 17.6% to $1.24 billion, above the FactSet consensus of $1.13 billion, amid strong initial public offering activity. Fixed income, currency and commodities revenue tumbled 45% to $2.32 billion, but topped expectations of $2.31 billion, while equities revenue fell 12% to $2.58 billion to beat expectations of $2.32 billion. Separately, Goldman raised its quarterly dividend to $2.00 a share from $1.25 a share, with the new dividend payable Sept. 29 to shareholders of record on Sept. 1. Goldman's stock has slipped 0.9% year to date through Monday, while the Dow Jones Industrial Average has gained 14.3%.
3:06 a.m. July 13, 2021 - By Tomi Kilgore
J.P. Morgan Chase stock falls after profit more than doubles but revenue declinesShares of J.P. Morgan Chase & Co. fell in 1.1% in premarket trading Tuesday, after the banking giant reported second-quarter a profit that more than doubled and revenue that beat expectations, even as markets revenue fell 30%, while net interest income fell below forecasts. Net income rose to $11.95 billion, or $3.78 a share, from $4.69 billion, or $1.38 a share, in the year-ago period. The FactSet consensus for earnings per share was $3.20. The bank said $3.0 billion of credit reserve releases boosted EPS by 75 cents. Net revenue fell 7.2% to $31.40 billion but beat the FactSet consensus of $29.97 billion, while net interest income fell 8% to $12.9 billion to miss expectations of $13.0 billion. Consumer and community banking revenue grew 3.3% to $12.76 billion, beating the FactSet consensus of $12.42 billion, and corporate and investment bank revenue dropped 19.3% to $13.21 billion but beat expectations of $12.19 billion. Fixed income markets revenue dropped 44% to $4.1 billion, missing expectations of $4.16 billion, while equity markets revenue rose 13% to $2.7 billion to be expectations of $2.31 billion. "This quarter we once again benefited from a significant reserve release as the environment continues to improve, but as we have said before, we do not consider these core or recurring profits," said Chief Executive Jamie Dimon. The stock has run up 24.3% year to date through Monday, while SPDR Financial Select Sector ETF has rallied 25.8% and the Dow Jones Industrial Average has advanced 14.3%.
9:52 a.m. July 12, 2021 - By Tomi Kilgore
Goldman, J.P. Morgan stocks adding nearly 90 points to the Dow's price ahead of earningsShares of Goldman Sachs Group Inc. are running up 2.8%, enough to pace the Dow Jones Industrial Average's gainers, while J.P. Morgan Chase & Co.'s stock is up 1.8% to be third on the list, a day before the banks help kick off the second-quarter earnings reporting season. The bank's stocks are adding about a combined 86 points to the Dow's price in afternoon trading, while the Dow rallied 104 points, or 0.3%. Both Goldman and J.P. Morgan Chase are scheduled , which will make them the first two Dow components to report results. Goldman is expected to report EPS of $10.24, up about 64% from a year ago, while J.P. Morgan Chase is expected to report EPS that more than doubles -- up about 130% -- to $3.18, according to FactSet.
1:48 a.m. July 9, 2021 - By Steve Goldstein
China's central bank lowers reserve requirements by a half pointThe People's Bank of China announced Friday it was cutting reserve requirements for its banks to help bolster the world's number-two economy. The PBOC said, effective July 15, that reserve requirements would be lowered by a half point, to a weighted average of 8.9%.
4:00 a.m. July 8, 2021 - By Tomi Kilgore
All 30 Dow stocks fall premarket, led by Boeing's and Salesforce's stocksThe selloff in the Dow Jones Industrial Average is unanimous, as all 30 components are losing ground in premarket trading. The biggest percentage decliners were shares of Boeing Co. , which fell 2.6%; Salesforce.com Inc. , which slid 2.3%; and J.P. Morgan Chase & Co. , which dropped 2.2%. The best performer was Verizon Communications Inc.'s stock , as it slipped just 0.6%. Dow futures tumbled 485 points, or 1.4%, amid .
8:25 a.m. July 6, 2021 - By Tomi Kilgore
American Express stock paces the Dow's winners after Goldman analyst turns bullishShares of American Express Co. rose 0.7% toward a record close in midday trading Tuesday, after Goldman Sachs analyst Ryan Nash turned bullish on the financial and travel services company, citing expectations of a "big pickup" in consumer spending. The stock was the biggest advancer among the three of 30 Dow Jones Industrial Average members gaining ground. Goldman's Nash upgraded AmEx to buy from neutral, as his $225 stock price target implied a near-33% gain from current levels. While AmEx (AXP) has laid out expectations to reach its original goals for 2020 in 2022, with the economy improving meaningfully and "a big pick-up in consumer spending" since AXP gave this guidance in January 2021, he believes the company is poised to exceed its original 2020 expectations of earnings per share of $8.85 to $9.25 by 2022, given accelerating consumer spending, improving small and medium business spending and benign credit. "In fact, we believe AXP has the potential to see ~$10.00 in EPS in 2022 and double-digit growth beyond then as the multi-year recovery in [travel and entertainment] as well as robust growth in goods and services makes up for 'lost ground' in 2020," Nash wrote in a note to clients. The stock's gain comes as the SPDR Financial Select Sector ETF slumped 1.7% in midday trading and the Dow dropped 367 points, or 1.1%. The stock last closed at a record of $169.45 on June 25.
1:08 p.m. June 21, 2021 - By Victor Reklaitis
Financial regulators tell Biden they're making progress on his climate-risk orderIn a meeting on Monday with President Biden, top U.S. financial regulators reported that they "were making steady progress" on his , the White House said in a statement. The regulators also "discussed ideas for promoting financial inclusion and for responsibly increasing access to credit for potential homeowners and small businesses," and they reported that the financial system is in "strong condition," the White House said. The meeting participants included Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen, Federal Reserve chief Jerome Powell and Securities and Exchange Commission Chairman Gary Gensler.
10:18 a.m. June 5, 2021 - By Quentin Fottrell
My husband of 30 years hid income with his mother’s help. When confronted he said, ‘I’m a liar. I’ve been doing this for 10 years!’ ‘I want to protect the last of my inheritance and two money-market accounts currently in my name’‘I want to protect the last of my inheritance and two money-market accounts currently in my name.’
8:09 a.m. May 30, 2021 - By Quentin Fottrell
My wife and I defrauded the government by hiding income. Now we’re divorcing, and she’s threatening to ruin us both ‘She left me for her pandemic boyfriend. She was caught at our vacation home with him’‘She left me for her pandemic boyfriend. She was caught at our vacation home with him.’
4:22 a.m. May 25, 2021 - By Quentin Fottrell
I moved 200 miles to live in my girlfriend’s new house. We have a child, but she’s reluctant to get married. I’d be left with nothing if we broke up ‘How can I protect myself financially from being completely left out in the cold if she wanted to break up with me?’‘How can I protect myself financially from being completely left out in the cold if she wanted to break up with me?’
9:40 a.m. May 24, 2021 - By Quentin Fottrell
My siblings live in our late mother’s home. They’re forcing me to sign over my share if I don’t pay for renovations. What can I do? ‘I do not want to sign away the only thing my mom left me’‘I do not want to sign away the only thing my mom left me.’
8:47 a.m. May 24, 2021 - By Tomi Kilgore
J.P. Morgan Chase rating outlook bumped up to 'positive'J.P. Morgan Chase & Co. rose 0.6% in midday trading Monday, to outperform its peer group but underperform the broader stock market, after Standard & Poor's revised up its outlook on the banking giant's credit rating to "positive" from "stable." The credit rating agency also affirmed A- long-term rating for the holding company and the A+ long-term rating for the operating company. "The positive outlook and ratings affirmation reflect our view that JPM, the largest U.S. bank by assets, has further added to its leading market shares across its diverse franchise while demonstrating superior resilience to the economic fallout from the COVID-19 pandemic," S&P said. The ratings agency said it also believes the bank's creditworthiness has benefited "disproportionately" from secular trends in the banking sector, including business consolidation, technological advancement and regulation. The stock's gain Monday comes as the SPDR Financial Select Sector ETF edged up 0.4%, while the Dow Jones Industrial Average rallied 164 points, or 0.6%, and the S&P 500 climbed 1.0%. Meanwhile, the yield on the 10-year Treasury note fell 2.4 basis points to 1.608%.
5:49 a.m. May 23, 2021 - By Quentin Fottrell
I care for my mother and sold her house. My sister says half the home belongs to her, and now she wants a loan. What do I do? ‘My father, who passed away in 2009, and my mother had a joint will leaving all they owned to my sister and me’‘My father, who passed away in 2009, and my mother had a joint will leaving all they owned to my sister and me’
5:37 a.m. May 23, 2021 - By Quentin Fottrell
My father left me his estate, and his adopted children nothing. I don’t want to lose them. What should I do? ‘The sum is rather large, and I’m going to be asked at some point how much I inherited. I’m concerned that they will be jealous and resentful’‘The sum is rather large, and I’m going to be asked at some point how much I inherited. I’m concerned that they will be jealous and resentful.’
Browse topics:

Filter results by

Industry

Financial Services (1188)

Banks (300)

Software (285)

Manufacturing (229)

Health-care (219)

Internet (215)

Location

Us (2067)

Asia Pacific (350)

Europe (315)

Eu (295)

China (171)

Japan (129)

Issue

Markets/exchanges (789)

General (508)

Commodities (422)

Economy (234)

Personal Finance (166)

Earnings (158)

Link to MarketWatch's Slice.