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Why the Omicron Covid Variant Concerns Scientists

  • Why the Omicron Covid Variant Concerns Scientists Why the Omicron Covid Variant Concerns Scientists 3:55
1:24 a.m. Dec. 2, 2021 - By Ciara Linnane
Coronavirus tally: Global cases of COVID-19 top 263.6 million and U.S. to stick with face mask mandate on public transportThe global tally for the coronavirus-borne illness climbed above 263.6 million on Tuesday, while the death toll edged above 5.22 million, according to . The U.S. continues to lead the world with a total of 48.7 million cases and 782,100 deaths. The U.S. is still averaging more than 900 deaths a day, , and cases and hospitalizations are rising again. The White House will announce later Thursday that it plans to stick with face mask mandates on public transportation, including planes, buses and trains, and will not allow the requirement to lapse on Jan. 18 as planned, The move is part of tighter travel restrictions aimed at containing the new omicron variant, and includes requiring that travelers into the U.S. provide a negative PCR test conducted 24 hours before departure, and not the 72 hours currently required. The government will also make at-home, COVID-19 tests available and make sure they are covered by private insurers or offered free at health centers. India is second by cases after the U.S. at 34.6 million and has suffered 469,724 deaths. Brazil has second highest death toll at 614,964 and 22.1 million cases. In Europe, Russia has the most fatalities at 272,279 deaths, followed by the U.K. at 145,586.
1:26 a.m. Nov. 30, 2021 - By Ciara Linnane
Tests suggest Regeneron antibody treatment for COVID loses effectiveness against omicron variant: WSJEarly tests suggest that the COVID-19 antibody treatment developed by Regeneron Pharmaceuticals Inc. loses effectiveness against the omicron variant of the coronavirus that causes COVID, but the full impact will only be known in the coming weeks after further testing, the company's president and chief scientific officer George Yancopoulos Evercore analysts had raised that issue Omicron is the variant from South Africa that was classified a 'variant of concern' by the World Health Organization on Friday, that has led several countries to impose restrictions on travel from there and neighboring countries. Separate testing of the antibody developed by Eli Lilly & Co. suggests it too is less effective against omicron. Researchers say that some antibody therapies are likely to be vulnerable to omicron because it contains mutations to the spike protein that the Regeneron and Lilly drugs target, while other drugs should hold up well because they attack elements of the virus unchanged in the variant. Yancopoulos said the company is already working on alternative antibodies that should hold up well against the variant. "What we have to admit is, in the course of the past six days, our urgency has increased," Dr. Yancopoulos said in an interview. "What started out as a backup plan has now been made a lot more urgent." Regeneron shares were down 2.7% premarket, but have gained 35% in the year to date, while the S&P 500 has gained 24%.
9:00 a.m. Nov. 26, 2021 - By Robert Schroeder
White House announces restrictions on travel from South Africa, 7 other countries The White House on Friday announced the U.S. will restrict travel from South Africa and seven other African nations starting Monday. Senior administration officials said the policy is being put in place "out of an abundance of caution in light of a new COVID-19 variant circulating in Southern Africa." The Dow Jones Industrial Average fell about 900 points on Friday on concerns over the new variant, which the World Health Organization . The seven other countries are Botswana, Zimbabwe, Namibia, Lesotho, Eswatini, Mozambique and Malawi. Administration officials said the new policy doesn't apply to U.S. citizens or permanent residents. A White House official said President Joe Biden has been briefed on the new COVID variant.
8:08 a.m. Nov. 26, 2021 - By Ciara Linnane
WHO names coronavirus variant from South Africa 'omicron' and designates it a 'variant of concern'The World Health Organization's technical advisory group said Friday it has assigned the B.1.1.529 variant of the coronavirus that causes COVID-19 the Greek letter omicron and said it has been designated a "variant of concern." Earlier reports . The variant, which was first reported from South Africa, led the U.K. and European Union to implement travel bans on South Africa and neighboring countries on Friday, amid concerns it may be more transmissible than the original virus and more lethal. "This variant has a large number of mutations, some of which are concerning," the group said in a statement. "Preliminary evidence suggests an increased risk of reinfection with this variant, as compared to other VOCs. The number of cases of this variant appears to be increasing in almost all provinces in South Africa." For now, there are a number of studies underway, and the group will continue to monitor and track the variant. It called on countries to enhance surveillance and sequencing efforts, to submit complete genome sequences and associated metadata to a publicly available database and to report cases and clusters to the WHO. "Individuals are reminded to take measures to reduce their risk of COVID-19, including proven public health and social measures such as wearing well-fitting masks, hand hygiene, physical distancing, improving ventilation of indoor spaces, avoiding crowded spaces, and getting vaccinated," said the statement.
2:31 a.m. Nov. 26, 2021 - By Steve Gelsi
Drug maker stocks rise but travel stocks sink on new coronavirus variantShares of airlines fell and drug makers rose in premarket trades on Friday as investors reacted to fresh travel bans related to a new variant of the coronavirus that causes COVID-19 called B.1.1.529 identified in South Africa. Meanwhile, stocks relating to 'stay-at-home' activities gained. The British government has banned flights from South Africa and five other southern African countries. The World Health Organization's technical working group is meeting Friday to discuss the variant. Pfizer advanced by 5.8%, Moderna gained 8.7%, Southwest Airlines dropped 7%, American Airlines stock slumped 7%; Expedia fell 6.8% and United Airlines dropped 7.6%. Delta Air Lines lost 7.8%, Norwegian Cruise gave up 9.6% and Royal Caribbean shares slid 10%. Netflix rose 2%.Take-Two Interactive Software rose by 1%.
1:59 a.m. Nov. 8, 2021 - By Ciara Linnane
Coronavirus tally: Global cases of COVID-19 near 250 million and U.S. reopens to vaccinated travelersThe global tally for the coronavirus-borne illness climbed above 249.9 million on Monday, while the death toll edged above 5.05 million, according to . The U.S. continues to lead the world with a total of 46.5 million cases and 754,431 deaths. The U.S. is still averaging about 1,200 deaths a day, although cases and hospitalizations are declining, outside of hot spots that include California and Colorado. More than a year and a half after COVID-19 concerns prompted the U.S. to close its borders to international travelers from countries including Brazil, China, India, South Africa, the United Kingdom and much of Europe, restrictions are shifting to focus on vaccine status, Beginning Monday, bans on travel from specific countries are over. The U.S. will allow in international travelers, but they must be vaccinated - with a few exceptions. The U.S. is also reopening the land borders with Canada and Mexico for vaccinated people. Most trips from Canada and Mexico to the U.S. are by land rather than air. India is second by cases after the U.S. at 34.4 million and has suffered 461,057 deaths. Brazil has second highest death toll at 609,447 and 21.9 million cases. In Europe, Russia has the most fatalities at 243,405 deaths, followed by the U.K. at 142,236.
1:14 a.m. Oct. 13, 2021 - By Ciara Linnane
Coronavirus tally: Global cases of COVID-19 edge toward 239 million and U.S. to reopen land borders in Nov.The global tally for the coronavirus-borne illness climbed above 238.7 million on Wednesday, while the death toll edged above 4.86 million, according to . The U.S. continues to lead the world with a total of 44.6 million cases and 716,479 deaths. The U.S. is averaging more than 1,900 deaths a day, , although new cases and hospitalizations are declining. The U.S. will reopen its land borders to nonessential travel next month, ending a 19-month freeze due to the COVID-19 pandemic as the country moves to require all international visitors to be vaccinated against the coronavirus, Vehicle, rail and ferry travel between the U.S. and Canada and Mexico has been largely restricted to essential travel, such as trade, since the earliest days of the pandemic. India is second by cases after the U.S. at 34 million and has suffered 451,189 deaths. Brazil has second highest death toll at 601,398 and 21.6 million cases. In Europe, Russia has most fatalities at 215,438, followed by the U.K. at 138,351.
8:53 a.m. Aug. 5, 2021 - By Ciara Linnane
UPDATE: Coronavirus tally: Global cases of COVID-19 top 200.5 million and U.S. to require foreign travelers are vaccinatedThe global tally for the coronavirus-borne illness headed above 200.5 million on Thursday, while the death toll climbed above 4.26 million according to . The U.S. leads the world with a total of 35.3 million cases and in deaths with 614,963 as the highly infectious delta variant continues to spread fast, especially in states with low vaccination rates. New cases are rising sharply and and the U.S. is now averaging more than seven times as many cases a day as it was at the beginning of July, according to a New York Times tracker. The Biden administration is taking the first steps toward requiring nearly all foreign visitors to the U.S. to be vaccinated for the coronavirus, a White House official said Wednesday, The requirement would come as part of the administration's phased approach to easing travel restrictions for foreign citizens to the country. No timeline has yet been determined, as interagency working groups study how and when to safely move toward resuming normal travel. India is second by cases at 31.8 million and third by deaths at 426,290 according to its official numbers, which are expected to be undercounted. Brazil is second in deaths at 559,607, but is third in cases at 20 million. Mexico has fourth-highest death toll at 242,547 but has recorded just 2.9 million cases, according to its official numbers. In Europe, Russia continues to pull ahead of the U.K. by deaths at 159,803, while the U.K. has 130,386, making Russia the country with the fifth-highest death toll in the world and highest in Europ
1:34 a.m. July 29, 2021 - By Ciara Linnane
Coronavirus tally: Global cases of COVID-19 top 196 million and Biden expected to detail vaccination plan for federal workersThe global tally for the coronavirus-borne illness climbed above 196 million on Thursday, while the death toll climbed above 4.18 million, according to . The U.S. leads the world with a total of 34.7 million cases and in deaths with 611,801 as the highly infectious delta variant continues to spread fast, especially in states with low vaccination rates. President Joe Biden will outline his plan to have federal workers either get vaccinated or face regular testing, social distancing, mask requirements and restrictions on travel later Thursday, The move comes as the federal government struggles to persuade vaccine hold-outs to get their shots. More than 97% of current cases, hospitalizations and deaths are in unvaccinated people, yet the CDC's vaccine tracker is barely budging from day to day. India is second by cases at 31.5 million and third by deaths at 422,662, according to its official numbers, which are expected to be undercounted. Brazil is second in deaths at 553,179, but is third in cases at 19.8 million. Mexico has fourth-highest death toll at 239,616 but has recorded just 2.8 million cases, according to its official numbers. In Europe, Russia continues to pull ahead of the U.K. by deaths at 154,403, while the U.K. has 129,718, making Russia the country with the fifth-highest death toll in the world and highest in Europe.
2:02 a.m. July 27, 2021 - By Ciara Linnane
Coronavirus tally: Global cases of COVID-19 top 194,7 million and U.S. to retain travel restrictionsThe global tally for the coronavirus-borne illness climbed above 194.7 million on Tuesday, while the death toll climbed above 4.16 million, according to . The U.S. leads the world with a total of 34.5 million cases and in deaths with 611,007 as the highly infectious delta variant continues to spread fast, especially in states with low vaccination rates. The federal government will keep existing COVID-19 travel restrictions on international travel in place for now due to concerns about the surging infection rate because of the delta variant, It was the latest sign that the White House is having to recalibrate its thinking around the coronavirus pandemic as the more infectious variant surges across the U.S. and a substantial chunk of the population resists vaccination. India is second by cases at 31.4 million and third by deaths at 421,382, according to its official numbers, which are expected to be undercounted. Brazil is second in deaths at 550,502, but is third in cases at 19.7 million. Mexico has fourth-highest death toll at 238,595 but has recorded just 2.7 million cases, according to its official numbers. In Europe, Russia continues to pull ahead of the U.K. by deaths at 152,836, while the U.K. has 129,460, making Russia the country with the fifth-highest death toll in the world and highest in Europe.
6:20 a.m. July 3, 2021 - By Kerry Hannon
Are you facing early retirement? Here’s how to prepare Financial advisers offer suggestions on this tricky decisionMany older workers who’ve lost jobs or been offered early retirement severance packages are choosing to pack it in.
1:30 a.m. July 1, 2021 - By Ciara Linnane
Coronavirus tally: Global cases of COVID-19 top 182 million and 10-week decline in cases in Europe comes to an endThe global tally for the coronavirus-borne illness headed above 182 million on Thursday, , while deaths climbed above 3.94 million. The U.S. continues to lead the world in total cases at 33.7 million, and by deaths that total 604,714. The World Health Organization said a 10-week decline in new cases in Europe has come to an end, with cases up 10% last week. WHO regional director for Europe Hans Kluge said the rise is due to relaxed restrictions and increased travel, and said a new wave will emerge if discipline is not maintained. On a global basis, India is second in total cases at 30.4 million and third by fatalities at 399,459, although those numbers are expected to be undercounted given a shortage of tests. Brazil has the third-highest caseload at 18.6 million, according to JHU data, and is second in deaths at 518,066. Mexico has fourth-highest death toll at 233,047 and 2.5 million cases. In Europe, Russia has overtaken the U.K. by deaths. Russia has 133,633 fatalities, while the U.K. has 128,404, making Russia the country with the fifth-highest death toll in the world and highest in Europe.
4:11 p.m. May 20, 2021 - By Quentin Fottrell
My boyfriend inherited a home and $700K. He pays me $500 monthly rent. Should I ask him for $86K to pay off my condo? ‘I am 65 and get a monthly pension of $800 and receive $1,800 Social Security every month. I have no savings, and own two properties’‘I am 65 and get a monthly pension of $800 and receive $1,800 Social Security every month. I have no savings, and own two properties.’
4:11 p.m. May 20, 2021 - By Quentin Fottrell
I’m worth $3 million, and separating from my much wealthier partner of 33 years. What kind of financial settlement can I expect? ‘When same-sex marriage became a possibility in New York, he declined to consider it because he did not want to take on any possible financial obligations that a future divorce might entail’‘When same-sex marriage became a possibility in New York, he declined to consider it because he did not want to take on any possible financial obligations that a future divorce might entail.’
7:26 a.m. May 16, 2021 - By Quentin Fottrell
Is it ethical for cruise lines, venues, schools or Broadway to restrict entry to people not vaccinated against COVID-19? Are vaccine holdouts ‘pathologically narcissistic’ or exercising their civil rights? And do private businesses have the right to refuse them? The Moneyist weighs inAre vaccine holdouts ‘pathologically narcissistic’ or exercising their civil rights? And do private businesses have the right to refuse them? The Moneyist weighs in.
9:36 a.m. April 30, 2021 - By Robert Schroeder
U.S. to restrict travel from India as COVID cases surgeThe Biden administration will restrict travel from India beginning May 4, the White House said Friday. "The policy will be implemented in light of extraordinarily high COVID-19 caseloads and multiple variants circulating in India," a statement said. The administration is acting on the advice of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. India on Friday , as the country's army opened its hospitals in the latest effort to address a dire humanitarian crisis.
6:50 a.m. April 27, 2021 - By Victor Reklaitis
All of President Biden’s key executive orders — in one chart Memorandums, proclamations, other executive actions also deployed Memorandums, proclamations, other executive actions also deployed As people and markets around the world adjust to having Joe Biden as U.S. president, a key factor is what the veteran Democratic politician aims to accomplish without having to work with Congress.
7:28 a.m. April 25, 2021 - By Quentin Fottrell
Ireland surpassed China in confirmed COVID-19 deaths — how on Earth did that happen? The Republic of Ireland, a small island at the northwestern tip of Europe, has a population of 4.9 million, compared with China’s 1.4 billion peopleThe Republic of Ireland, the small island on the northwestern tip of Europe, has a population of 4.9 million, compared to China’s 1.4 billion people.
6:29 a.m. April 23, 2021 - By Victor Reklaitis
Biden to visit U.K., Belgium in June for first overseas travelPresident Joe Biden plans to travel to the U.K. and Belgium in June for his first overseas trips since taking office, the White House said Friday. He plans to attend a G7 summit in Cornwall on June 11-13 and then take part in a NATO summit in Brussels on June 14.
1:38 a.m. April 20, 2021 - By Ciara Linnane
Coronavirus tally: Global cases of COVID-19 top 142 million and U.S. death toll nears 568,000The global tally for the coronavirus-borne illness rose above 142 million on Tuesday, according to , as the death toll climbed above 3.03 million, after breaching the 3 million mark on Saturday. The U.S. leads the world in cases and deaths by wide margins, with 31.7 million cases, or more than 20% of the global total, while the 567,729 death toll makes up about 20% of the global toll. The U.S. added at least 70,355 new cases and 483 new deaths on Monday, The U.S. has averaged 67,175 cases a day in the past week, up 4% from the average two weeks ago. But the global case tally hit an almost record of more than 750,000 on Sunday and Monday, according to the Washington Post, as India and Brazil remain hot spots. The State Department is expected later Tuesday to add the number of countries on its "Do Not Travel" list to 80% of the world from 16%, the paper reported. Outside of the U.S., India has the second highest number of cases at 15.3 million, and is fourth globally by deaths at 180,530. Brazil is third by cases at 13.9 million and second with a death toll of 374,682. Mexico is third by deaths at 212,466 and 14th highest by cases at 2.3 million. The U.K. has 4.4 million cases and 127,524 deaths, the highest in Europe and fifth highest in the world.
8:28 p.m. April 18, 2021 - By Quentin Fottrell
The public’s expectation of perfection: Risk of blood clot from Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine is 0.00009% ‘It’s the same perceptual problem when we blindly drive to the airport texting, yet worry about the airplane’‘It’s the same perceptual problem when we blindly drive to the airport texting, yet worry about the airplane.’
5:52 a.m. April 4, 2021 - By Quentin Fottrell
I’m 68, earn $130,000 and love eco-travel in Peru, Brazil and Africa. I want to travel while I can, but I’m scared to stop working ‘I have a little over $300,000 in savings and $400,000 equity in my own home. I also have about $835,000 in a 401(k)’‘I have a little over $300,000 in savings and $400,000 equity in my own home. I also have about $835,000 in a 401(k).’
9:00 a.m. April 2, 2021 - By Alessandra Malito
News and analysis for those planning for or living in retirement Retirement news and analysisRetirement news and analysis
6:45 a.m. April 2, 2021 - By Jaimy Lee
CDC issues new travel guidance for people who are fully vaccinatedThe Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Friday issued new guidance for , saying people who are fully immunized against COVID-19 can travel in the U.S. and do not need to get tested or quarantine. This is a shift from March when the agency said to provide updated travel guidance when it issued new recommendations for people who have been vaccinated. "Here's what we know: Every time that there's a surge in travel, we have a surge in cases in this country," CDC director Dr. Rochelle Walensky said during a . As part of the new guidance for , the CDC also said fully vaccinated Americans can travel internationally without needing a COVID-19 test before they leave unless it is required by that country and do not need to self-quarantine upon return unless required by their state. However, they should have a negative test result before they return to the U.S. and get tested within 5 days of their return.
6:50 a.m. March 28, 2021 - By Quentin Fottrell
‘I feel un-American’: I was broke in my 20s, and live in fear of debt. My wife wants to upgrade our home and life. What do I do? ‘During my 20s, I was broke. I had three maxed-out credit cards and lived paycheck to paycheck’‘During my 20s, I was broke. I bought my first house and lived alone, stretched to my limits. I had three maxed-out credit cards and lived paycheck to paycheck.’
8:45 a.m. March 27, 2021 - By Catey Hill
‘I love guns, liberty and independence — and despise high taxes. Where should I retire?’ Have a question about retirement, including where to retire? Email chill@marketwatch.com. This retiree is looking for some spots where he can ‘live and let live.’
12:12 p.m. March 24, 2021 - By Andrew Keshner
Equal Pay Day: How paid-leave and child-care policies failed to close gender pay gap Women typically need at least one extra degree to earn as much as their male colleaguesWomen typically need at least one extra degree to earn as much as their male colleagues.
1:28 p.m. March 20, 2021 - By Quentin Fottrell
‘I have tried to be kind’: I gave my ex half of the first two stimulus checks for our child. He still calls me a ‘monster.’ What do I do with the third? ‘I am bugged by him paying nothing while also going on trips and buying vehicles when he gets extra money, instead of paying anything to me for our child. Maybe I am being petty’‘I am bugged by him paying nothing while also going on trips and buying vehicles when he gets extra money, instead of paying anything to me for our child. Maybe I am being petty.’
4:47 a.m. March 11, 2021 - By Steve Goldstein
Public Health England says there's a new coronavirus variant under investigationPublic Health England said it's designated a new coronavirus variant under investigation. The health authority said it's found two cases in the South East of England in individuals who had recently travelled to Antigua. Contact tracing teams have completed thorough investigations to identify and follow up any close contacts and no additional cases have been found to date, it said. A separate variant of concern, called P.1, has been found in 10 people, all of which have links to travel or to a previously confirmed case that has travelled to Brazil.
6:37 a.m. March 8, 2021 - By Jaimy Lee
CDC says vaccinated people can gather indoors in small groups without masksFederal health officials said Monday that fully vaccinated people can socialize together indoors in small groups without taking any preventative measures such as wearing a mask or social distancing if it takes place at least two weeks after completing their COVID-19 vaccination regimen. This includes people who have received both doses of the Pfizer Inc. or Moderna Inc. vaccines or one dose of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine. Dr. Rochelle Walensky, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, also said during a White House briefing that vaccinated households can socialize indoors with one other unvaccinated household without taking preventative measures (as long as no one in the unvaccinated group is at high risk for severe disease), and that vaccinated people do not need to quarantine after being exposed to someone who tests positive for COVID-19 as long as they do not have symptoms. The CDC's does not address travel. Walensky also noted that "there is still a small risk that vaccinated people could become infected with milder or asymptomatic disease and potentially even transmit the virus to others who are not vaccinated."
9:22 a.m. March 7, 2021 - By Quentin Fottrell
My husband and his brother inherited a property. Our son moved in. We paid $60K in taxes and repairs. Do we split it 50/50? ‘The house is probably 90 years old, and needed quite a lot of work before they could move in’‘The house is probably 90 years old, and needed quite a lot of work before they could move in.’
9:00 a.m. March 5, 2021 - By Alessandra Malito
News and analysis for those planning for or living in retirement Retirement news and analysisRetirement news and analysis
6:26 a.m. March 1, 2021 - By Quentin Fottrell
We started a homeschool pod with another family. After our out-of-state vacation, they isolated from us and refused to split the nanny cost for 2 weeks. Who’s right? ‘I still paid my share of the nanny during our absence and intended to pay the nanny in full after our return, although I did not agree with their assessment’‘I still paid my share of the nanny during our absence and intended to pay the nanny in full after our return, although I did not agree with their assessment.’
9:02 a.m. Jan. 31, 2021 - By Quentin Fottrell
My sister is a single mother and thinks ‘squatter rights’ is the way to secure housing in the pandemic. What can I do? ‘She has been better with her money the last three months, but she has been very irresponsible in her spending the last few years — paying for breast implants, for example’‘She has been better with her money the last three months, but she has been very irresponsible in her spending the last few years — paying for breast implants, for example.’
7:56 a.m. Jan. 28, 2021 - By Jaimy Lee
South Carolina officials confirm first two cases of South African variant in the U.S. Health officials in South Carolina confirmed that two people in the state have tested positive for a new coronavirus variant that was first identified in South Africa. These are the first two confirmed cases of the more infectious variant in the U.S. The South African strain, which is called B.1.351, is one of several new variants wthat have emerged around the world and are raising concern among government officials and medical experts over their transmissibility. The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control confirmed the two cases in residents of the Lowcountry and the Pee Dee region in a on Thursday. Neither adult has a travel history, and they do not know each other, officials said. Health departments use genomic sequencing to identify new strains or variants among COVID-19 test samples; this is how the South Carolina health department identified both cases. Another variant, the B.1.1.7, which was first detected in the United Kingdom, has infected more than 300 people in the U.S. so far, according to the from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. This variant is also thought to be more infectious. This week, Moderna Inc. said a laboratory study demonstrated that its COVID-19 vaccine against the B.1.351 strain, and Regeneron Pharmaceuticals Inc. said one of the two antibodies used in its COVID-19 treatment .
9:33 a.m. Jan. 25, 2021 - By Ciara Linnane
Biden to reinstate travel bans amid fears about new variants as global case tally heads toward 100 million Dr. Fauci says Johnson & Johnson’s one-dose vaccine could bet emergency use authorization within two weeksThe global tally of confirmed cases of the coronavirus-borne illness COVID-19 headed closer to 100 million on Monday with the U.S. accounting for a quarter of that total, as President Joe Biden prepared to reinstate travel restrictions against foreign citizens visiting the U.S. from Brazil, the U.K, Ireland and much of the rest of Europe, as well as South Africa.
11:59 a.m. Jan. 16, 2021 - By Quentin Fottrell
‘Deaths of despair’ during COVID-19 have risen significantly in 2020, new research says They were disproportionately experienced by working aged men, driven in part by synthetic opioids, according to Casey Mulligan, professor of economics at the University of ChicagoThey were disproportionately experienced by working aged men, driven in part by synthetic opioids such as fentanyl, according to Casey Mulligan, professor of economics at the University of Chicago.
9:21 a.m. Jan. 13, 2021 - By Ciara Linnane
U.S. sees record one-day death toll and experts worry new variant may make activities like plane travel more risky Vaccine program must speed up to avoid reaching 640,000 deaths by spring, equal to lives lost in the 1918 flu pandemicThe U.S. set another grim milestone in the coronavirus pandemic on Tuesday, when more than 4,400 COVID-19 patients died, the most in a single day since the start of the outbreak, and experts said that with cases continuing to accelerate, the worst is still to come.
12:30 p.m. Jan. 11, 2021 - By Ciara Linnane
U.S. tops 22 million cases of COVID-19 after adding record of more than 300,000 in a day ‘COVID remains out of control in the U.S.,’ analyst saysThe global case tally for the coronavirus illness COVID-19 rose above 90 million on Monday, and the U.S. topped 22 million confirmed cases, after setting a record for new cases in a single day of more than 300,000 on Friday.
7:57 a.m. Jan. 9, 2021 - By Quentin Fottrell
Dr. Fauci on COVID-19 infections: ‘Things will get worse as we get into January’ Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, has warned of a ‘dark time’ in mid-January Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, warned of a ‘dark time’ in mid-January after Christmas and Hanukkah.
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