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4:36 a.m. May 7, 2021 - By Sunny Oh
10-year Treasury yield slides below 1.50% after weaker-than-expected jobs reportLong-dated U.S. Treasury yields fell sharply on Friday after the Labor Department reported the economy had added 266,000 jobs in April, falling well short of the 1 million gains forecast by MarketWatch-polled economists. The 10-year Treasury note yield was down 6.6 basis points to 1.495%, while the 30-year bond yield tumbled 5.5 basis points to 2.181%. Prior to the report, investors were expecting that a strong jobs report would add to the case for faster pace of liftoff from the Federal Reserve's easy-money policies.
12:20 p.m. May 5, 2021 - By Greg Robb
Fed Vice Chairman Clarida says it is not time yet to talk about taperingFederal Reserve Vice Chairman Richard Clarida on Wednesday said it was not time yet to begin conversations about possibly scaling back the central bank's asset purchases. The Fed is buying $120 billion per month of Treasurys and mortgage-related securities as well as keeping interest rates close to zero in order to stimulate the economy. The Fed has said it wants to see "substantial further progress" on its goals of full employment and stable inflation before tapering. Asked when the Fed should start "talking about talking about" tapering, Clarida replied: "We don't think so right now." Dallas Fed President Robert Kaplan said earlier this week it was time to start the discussion about tapering. Several Fed officials speaking on Wednesday have all disagreed with Kaplan. "We'll get more data -and as we move through the year- we will be able to make a judgement on 'substantial further progress,' but we're not there yet," Clarida said.
5:30 a.m. May 5, 2021 - By Greg Robb
Fed's Evans says chances of persistently higher inflation are 'remote'The chances that the $2.8 trillion stimulus measures passed by Congress since December will overheat the economy and generate higher inflation are remote, said Chicago Fed President Charles Evans on Wednesday. Inflation is likely to pick up in coming months as people resume normal activities and some bottlenecks emerge but simulations performed by economists at the Chicago Fed see inflation topping out at less than a full percentage point and dissipating in two or three years, Evans said in a speech to the Levy Economics Institute of Bard College. "We still have some ways to go before we meet our goals" of full employment and stable 2% average inflation, Evans said. As a result, Fed policy "is likely on hold for some time," he added. Labor market conditions required to move interest rates off zero or to start to taper the $120 billion in monthly asset purchases "will not be met for a while," he said.
4:42 a.m. April 2, 2021 - By Sunny Oh
Treasury yields tick higher after jobs reportU.S. Treasury yields moved higher on Friday after a stronger-than-expected jobs report on Friday. The Labor Department said the U.S. economy had added 916,000 jobs in March, above the forecast of 675,000, pushing the unemployment rate down to 6% from 6.2%. The 10-year Treasury note yield rose 1.6 basis points 1.695%, while the 2-year note rate was up a basis point to 0.170%. The 30-year bond yield gained 0.8 basis point to 2.348%. Bond prices move inversely to yields. A faster pace of job gains will add to the growing impression of a U.S. economy gaining steam, and potentially push investors to bring forward the timing of the Federal Reserve's eventual pullback from its accommodative policies.
10:06 a.m. March 24, 2021 - By Greg Robb
Fed's Williams doesn't expect inflation pressures building over next couple of yearsThe U.S. economy will recover "really nicely" over the next couple of years, but this doesn't mean inflation pressures will build, said New York Fed President John Williams on Wednesday. "I don't see inflationary pressures really building during that time," Williams said during a webinar sponsored by Syracuse University. He noted that inflation rates around the world are very low. In addition, there are still 9 million fewer jobs in the U.S. economy than at the start of the pandemic. If inflation does surprise to the upside, the Fed has the tools to get inflation down near the Fed's 2% annual goal, Williams said.
10:29 a.m. March 23, 2021 - MarketWatch.com
Powell, Yellen face House panel amid concerns over deficit, inflation: live blog Biden’s reported $3 trillion package for infrastructure expected to dominate hearingFed Chairman Jerome Powell and Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen testify together for the first time Tuesday before the House Financial Services panel.
12:30 p.m. March 22, 2021 - By Greg Robb
Powell says U.S. economy 'looks to be strengthening'The U.S. economy has recovered more quickly than generally expected "and looks to be strengthening," said Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell in remarks released on Monday. Consumer spending, housing, business investment and manufacturing productions have all picked up, he noted. This good news is due to the unprecedented support from Congress and the central bank in fighting COVID, Powell said. "But the recovery is far from complete, so, at the Fed, we will continue to provide the economy with the support that it needs for as long as it takes," he said. The path of the economy still depends on the pandemic, Powell added. He made the comments in testimony to be delivered Tuesday to a House Financial Services Committee hearing on the government's response to COVID. It is the panel's custom to release text of testimony on the night before a hearing.
6:19 a.m. March 19, 2021 - By Andrea Riquier
Bank ETFs slide on surprise Fed decisionExchange-traded funds with exposure to the financial sector slipped on Friday after the Federal Reserve said it would not extend a measure of bank regulatory relief. The Invesco KWB Bank ETF was down 2.2% mid-morning, and the First Trust Nasdaq Bank ETF and the Financial Select Sector SPDR Fund each fell 1.7%. Regional-bank funds fared the same: the iShares U.S. Regional Banks ETF gave up 1.7%. The Fed's decision means that starting on April 1, big banks will have to include Treasurys in calculation of the Supplementary Leverage Ratio. An exemption to that rule was put in place in the aftermath of the coronavirus market shocks.
10:33 a.m. March 17, 2021 - By Andrea Riquier
Homebuilder ETFs jump after Fed statementHome-builder exchange-traded funds rallied after the Federal Reserve said it would hold off on raising interest rates at least through the end of 2023. The iShares U.S. Home Construction ETF gained 2.7% in the mid-afternoon, while the SPDR S&P Homebuilders ETF was up 1.2%. The Invesco Dynamic Building & Construction ETF ticked up 0.3%. Home-builder stocks fell in the morning after a disappointing housing-starts report, but rebounded after the central bank released its policy announcement mid-afternoon.
8:35 a.m. March 17, 2021 - MarketWatch.com
Fed faces communication challenge as doubts mount about its easy policy stance: live blog In wake of vaccine-rollout and $1.9 trillion stimulus, markets think first Fed interest-rate hike is no longer years awayThe Federal Reserve will release its latest views on the economy and the ‘dot-plot’ view of interest rate policy at 2pm Eastern. Fed Chairman Jerome Powell will follow with a press conference a half-hour later.
5:35 a.m. March 17, 2021 - By Sunny Oh
Nasdaq stumbles at the open after 10-year Treasury rises before Fed updateU.S. stocks were mostly lower at the start of Wednesday's session as a rise in long-term Treasury yields appeared to weigh on tech shares. Investors will watch the Federal Reserve's policy update in the afternoon where it could bring forward its expectations for a first rate hike through the so-called dot plot. The S&P 500 fell 0.4% to 3,947. The Dow Jones industrial Average rose 27 points, or 0.1%, to 32,853. The Nasdaq Composite slid 1% to 13,338. The 10-year Treasury yield rose 4.1 basis points to 1.664%, briefly hitting its highest level since Jan. 2020. Bond prices move inversely to yields.
6:32 a.m. March 12, 2021 - By Sunny Oh
10-year Treasury yield pushes above 1.60% ahead of next week's Fed meetingU.S. Treasury yields extended their rise on Friday before next week's Federal Reserve meeting where the central bank may opine on the impact of the bond-market selloff on financial conditions. The 10-year Treasury note yield surged 10.6 basis points to 1.633%, its highest level since around Feb. 2020. Bond prices move inversely to yields. Though it wasn't clear what had triggered the sharp surge in yields, investors suggest the fiscal relief bill passed this week may be energizing the bond-market bears. Tom di Galoma, managing director of Treasurys trading at Seaport Global Securities, said if the 10-year closed above 1.64%, the next move for the benchmark maturity would be towards 1.75%.
4:37 a.m. March 5, 2021 - By Sunny Oh
10-year Treasury yield shoots above 1.60% after jobs reportU.S. Treasury yields climbed after the February jobs report showed higher-than-expected job gains, adding to doubts whether the Federal Reserve will able to stay as accommodative for as long as they have signaled. The 10-year Treasury note yield rose 6.2 basis points to 1.612%, a February high, while the 2-year note rate was up 0.6 basis point to 0.151%. The 30-year bond yield rose 3 basis points to 2.33%. The U.S. economy added 379,000 jobs in February, above the forecast of 210,000.
10:26 a.m. March 4, 2021 - By Mark DeCambre
Wall Street's 'fear index' surges to highest level in about 5 weeks as Treasury-yield spike sparks stock-market selloffA closely watched gauge of expected stock-market volatility jumped Thursday to around its highest level since the end of January as a tech-led selloff dragged major benchmarks sharply lower. The CBOE Volatility Index is known by its ticker symbol "VIX", rose 5.07 points to 31.44, a gain of nearly 18%. A close at that level would represent the highest level for the so-called fear index since Jan. 29, according to Dow Jones Market Data. The VIX is an options-based measure of expected volatility over the coming 30 days for the S&P 500 . The VIX, which typically jumps during big stock-market selloffs, also tends to fall back during long, gradual rallies, and has remained stubbornly elevated above its long-term average of 19.50 as stocks pushed back into record territory in recent weeks. But a rise in yields and comments from Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell on Thursday breathed new life into the yield rise and prompted a reassessment of stock values compared against rising fixed-income yields. The Dow Jones Industrial Average was under pressure and the technology-laden Nasdaq Composite Index was on the verge of tumbling into correction, defined as a decline of at least 10% from a recent peak.
10:18 a.m. March 4, 2021 - By Sunny Oh
Goldman Sachs raises 10-year Treasury yield target to 1.90%Goldman Sachs on Thursday raised its Treasury yield target, forecasting the 10-year note rate to hit 1.90% by the end of the year amid a quickening bond-market selloff. The benchmark maturity is up 6.6 basis points to 1.536%. "The already material repricing in global yields will, in our view, extend after some consolidation, driven by a strong acceleration in the global recovery over the coming quarters," said Goldman Sachs strategists led by Praveen Korapaty. The rise in yields over the past few weeks has led banks across Wall Street to repeatedly lift their year-end Treasury yield targets. The combination of fiscal relief and vaccine rollouts have fanned inflation fears, and raised doubts among investors over whether Federal Reserve can stick to its accommodative policy stance for as long as it has signaled.
9:06 a.m. March 4, 2021 - By Sunny Oh
10-year Treasury yield jumps above 1.50% Thursday afternoon after Powell refers to inflation's rise as transitoryU.S. Treasury yields Thursday after Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell said he was monitoring the rise in bond yields and that he would be concerned if financial conditions did tighten. "I would be concerned by disorderly conditions in markets or persistent tightening in financial conditions that threatens the achievement of our goals," Powell said during a webinar hosted by The Wall Street Journal. The 10-year Treasury note yield climbed 7.1 basis points to 1.541%. Bond prices fall as yields rise. Many investors had said that if Powell didn't offer more explicit pushback on higher government bond rates, it could fuel Treasury market weakness. Powell stressed again that the Fed would be "patient" with higher inflation expected this year, saying it was likely to be a "one time" effect and not price gains that continue year-after-year.
5:53 a.m. March 3, 2021 - By Sunny Oh
Gauge of bond-market inflation expectations hits highest since 2008A gauge of future price pressures from holders of Treasury inflation-protected securities are trading at their highest levels in over a decade. The 5-year breakeven rate, which reflects estimates of consumer prices over the next 5 years, stood at 2.50% on Wednesday. The rise in inflation expectations followed climbing bond yields on Wednesday, with the 10-year Treasury note rate up 6.9 basis points to 1.484%. Bond prices move inversely to yields. Investors have been betting that the combination of an accommodative Federal Reserve, trillions in fiscal relief and the reopening of the U.S. economy will lead to a sustained rise in price levels.
7:24 a.m. Feb. 25, 2021 - By Sunny Oh
5-year Treasury note yield hits 0.75% as rate-hike bets accelerateShorter-term Treasury yields were on the move on Thursday as the U.S. government bond market came under assault this week. The 5-year Treasury note yield was up 13 basis points to around 0.76%. Bond prices move in the opposite direction of yields. the 10-year note yield rose 8.4 basis points to 1.473%. Investors are closely eyeing the movements of the 5-year note as it roughly overlaps with the timetable for when the Federal Reserve is expected to carry out its first rate hikes since the pandemic. A higher 5-year note rate would signify bond traders are pricing in more monetary tightening as reflation fears gain ground.
10:43 a.m. Feb. 24, 2021 - MarketWatch.com
Powell says strong growth later this year is his ‘base-case’ forecast: live blog recap Fed chairman also talks about digital dollar, climate change Fed Chairman Jerome Powell said Wednesday his “base case” forecast is strong growth later this year.
5:37 a.m. Feb. 24, 2021 - By Mark DeCambre
Dow, S&P 500 skid lower at Wednesday's open as 10-year Treasury jumps to 1.42% ahead of second day of Powell testimonyU.S. stock skidded lower at Wednesday's open as investors continued to react to a persistent rise in bond yields, with the 10-year Treasury note rising above 1.4% and putting pressure on equities, a day after Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell attempted to soothe the market by emphasizing that easy-moeny policies would be in place for the foreseeable future. Powell is set to deliver a second day of testimony in front of the House starting at 10 a.m. Eastern. Bond yields began to perk up again on Wednesday after the Food and Drug Administration said that Johnson & Johnson's single-dose COVID-19 vaccine candidate has no unexpected safety concerns, in a step that moves the experimental vaccine one step closer to emergency authorization. The Dow Jones Industrial Average was off less than 0.1% and trading flat, the S&P 500 index was trading 0.1% lower at 3,876, while the Nasdaq Composite Index was declining 0.5%. The 10-year Treasury note hit a rate at around 1.42%. Stock markets have wavered in recent days following a strong start to the year, with highflying tech companies leading declines. Investors said a rise in government bond yields, driven by improving growth prospects and rising inflation expectations, has accelerated a rotation out of the tech stocks that led markets higher during the pandemic, and into the stocks best placed to benefit from an end to lockdowns.
10:03 a.m. Feb. 23, 2021 - MarketWatch.com
Powell says economy still ‘long way’ from full health: live-blog recap Fed chairman says rising bond yields show market is confident of improved economyHere is a recap of live blog of Fed Chairman Jerome Powell’s testimony to the Senate Banking Committee.
5:31 a.m. Feb. 23, 2021 - By Andrea Riquier
Stocks fall at the open, led by tech, with all eyes on PowellU.S. stocks opened lower Tuesday, extending a sell-off triggered by a spike in bond yields. The Dow Jones Industrial Average lost 56 points, 0.2%, to open near 31,466, while the S&P 500 lost 19 points or 0.5%, opening at about 3,857. The Nasdaq Composite Index , which is heavily weighted toward technology names, slid 281 points, 2.1%, to open near 13,256. Tech shares, which surged thanks to the stay-at-home trade throughout 2020, are considered most vulnerable to a rising rate environment, which will bite into margins. Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell is set to address Congress Tuesday and Wednesday, and his words will be closely monitored for hints about how the central bank will handle the bond sell-off.
7:31 a.m. Feb. 19, 2021 - By Sunny Oh
30-year 'real' yield turns positive, pointing to specter of higher borrowing costsThe 30-year yield for a Treasury inflation-protected security turned positive for the first time since last June on Friday, a sign that investors are anticipating a tightening of financial conditions as the economy recovers. Negative real, or inflation-adjusted, yields were seen as a result of the Federal Reserve's accommodative monetary policy. Higher real yields therefore speak to concerns the economy may face rising borrowing costs at a time when the pandemic is continuing to hamper growth and afflict the finances of households.
11:55 a.m. Feb. 16, 2021 - By Greg Robb
Fed's Daly says runaway inflation isn't around the cornerInvestors shouldn't worry that there will suddenly be an outbreak of higher inflation, said San Francisco Fed President Mary Daly on Tuesday. "There is a concern out there...that we are spurring unwanted inflation," Daly said during a talk at the University of San Francisco. "I am not thinking that we have unwanted inflation around the corner," Daly said. If inflation should suddenly rise, the Fed is "very very good and practiced" at keeping inflation down at 2%. "I do think we should be less fearful about inflation around the corner and recognize that fear costs millions of jobs," added Daly, who a voting member of the Fed's interest-rate committee this year.
11:47 a.m. Feb. 9, 2021 - By Alicia H. Munnell
What will low interest rates do to retirement savings? If rates continue to hover around zero, people will need to save large amountsIf rates continue to hover around zero, people will need to save large amounts
11:53 a.m. Jan. 12, 2021 - By Sunny Oh
10-year Treasury yield records longest streak of daily increases since 2017The benchmark 10-year Treasury note booked its seventh consecutive increase on Tuesday, its longest streak since September 2017 when the Federal Reserve started to cut the size of its post-crisis balance sheet under former Fed Chairman Janet Yellen. Yet the Fed's portfolio has ballooned after the central bank stepped in to support the economy and markets last March. The 10-year note yield was up 0.5 basis point to 1.136% on Tuesday. The bond market has come under sustained pressure in January amid expectations for additional fiscal stimulus under a Biden administration and a Democratic-controlled Congress.
4:53 a.m. Jan. 12, 2021 - By Sunny Oh
2-year/10-year Treasury yield curve steepest since mid-2017The U.S. yield curve continued to steepen amid fears of more fiscal stimulus under a Democratic-controlled Congress and growing questions whether the Federal Reserve may ease off its accommodative policy stance earlier than forecast. The spread between the 2-year and the 10-year note , a gauge of the yield curve's slope, stood at 1.02 percentage points, the widest since around May 2017. A steeper yield curve can reflect heightened growth and inflation expectations among bond traders. Some of the weakness in longer-dated Treasurys also reflected broker-dealers making room for new issuance this week, with an auction of $38 billion of 10-year notes due in the afternoon.
11:15 a.m. Jan. 5, 2021 - By Alex Mashinsky
3 steps to take in your 20s to make sure you see retirement How to reach financial independence when interest is 0% and there’s no return on bondsGetting to financial independence in a world with 0% rates and no returns on bonds
6:04 a.m. Jan. 4, 2021 - By Sunny Oh
Inflation expectations hit over two-year high as reflation bets get underway to start 2021Bond investors' assessment of future inflation are heating up amid hopes that vaccine rollouts will help bring about a swifter economic recovery this year. The 10-year breakeven rate, or what holders of Treasury inflation-protected securities anticipate inflation will average over the next decade, rose to 2.01% on Monday, around its highest since November 2018 and also near the Federal Reserve's key 2% inflation target. The iShares TIPs Bond exchange-traded fund was down 0.1%.
7:42 a.m. Dec. 17, 2020 - By Louis D’Anella
These are the last days of small government and investors need to prepare for ‘neofiscalism’ Government is going to take a bigger role in the economy and that will affect your investment decisionsGovernment is going to take a bigger role in the economy and that will affect your investment decisions.
12:04 p.m. Dec. 16, 2020 - By Mark DeCambre
Nasdaq ends at record, S&P 500 narrowly misses closing high as Fed emphasizes 0% interest rates through 2023 U.S. stocks finished at or near records on Wednesday, though the Dow closed nearly flat, as the Federal Reserve did little to indicate a change of the regime of ultralow interest rates amid the pandemic. The Fed said it was optimistic on the current recovery but emphasized that the outlook for the economy will hinge on how the U.S. deals with the worst viral outbreak in more than a century. Federal-funds rates were held at a range between 0% and 0.25%, as expected, as Washington tries to hammer out an agreement on another round of financial aid to combat the economic harm from the coronavirus. The central bank increased its GDP forecast but didn't adjust its $120 billion asset purchases, as had been expected by some Fed watchers. "Together these measures will ensure that monetary policy will continue to deliver powerful support for the economy until the recovery is complete," Fed Chairman Jerome Powell said at a news conference after Wednesday's statement was released. "A big yawn," is how Michael Arone, chief investment strategist at State Street Global Advisors, described the policy update to MarketWatch, immediately after the release. The Dow Jones Industrial Average closed down by about 44 points, or 0.2%, at around 30,155; the S&P 500 index rose 0.2% to 3,701, just shy of its Dec. 8 closing record at 3,702.25' while the Nasdaq Composite Index booked a 0.5% rise to a record close at about 12,658. In economic reports, a retail sales report showed that the economy may be slowing as coronavirus cases surge. U.S. retail sales dropped a seasonally adjusted 1.1% in November from the prior month. The data and Fed update come as congressional lawmakers were hammering out a roughly $900 billion deal that was expected to include another round of direct payments to households, The Wall Street Journal reported. In corporate news, Shares of Facebook Inc. were in focus after it launched a PR assault against Apple Inc. claiming the iPhone maker's upcoming mobile operating system update will hurt small businesses. Bond yields also edged higher, with the 10-year Treasury note yielding 0.92%.
10:23 a.m. Dec. 16, 2020 - By Mark DeCambre
Dow adds to slight losses Wednesday as Fed says path of economy next year depends on coronavirusU.S. stocks traded off their highest levels of the session on Wednesday, and losses deepened for the Dow, as investors parsed the last policy update of 2020 from the Federal Reserve, which did little to indicate a change of the regime of ultralow interest rates amid the pandemic. The Fed said it was optimistic on the current recovery but noted that the outlook for the economy will hinge on how the U.S. deals with the worst viral outbreak in more than a century. Federal-funds rates were held at a range between 0% and 0.25%, as expected, as Washington tries to hammer out an agreement on another round of financial aid to combat the economic harm from the coronavirus. The central bank increased its GDP forecast but did little to adjust its asset purchases, as had been expected by some Fed watchers. "A big yawn," is how Michael Arone, chief investment strategist at State Street Global Advisors, described the policy update to MarketWatch, immediately after the release. The Dow Jones Industrial Average was trading of by about 100 points, or 0.3%, lower at 30,104, the S&P 500 index slipped into negative territory at 3,693, while the Nasdaq Composite Index pared its gains, up 0.2% at 12,618. Fed Chairman Jerome Powell will host a news conference at 2:30 p.m.
10:54 a.m. Nov. 25, 2020 - By Greg Robb
‘Most’ Fed officials want to give better guidance to investors about its massive bond-buying program, minutes show Central bankers are not all on same page about U.S. quantitative easing programMost senior Fed officials want to provide better guidance to investors about its on-going bond-buying program, for instance explaining what economic conditions would need to be reached before the purchases can end.
8:18 a.m. Nov. 25, 2020 - By Greg Robb
U.S. consumer spending moderates in October Incomes fell last month, a sign of waning federal stimulusU.S. consumer spending rose 0.5% in October, the smallest gain since April, the government said Wednesday,.
6:10 a.m. Nov. 25, 2020 - By Greg Robb
U.S. consumer spending moderates in October Consumer spending moderated in October, the government said Wednesday. Consumer spending rose 0.5% after a revised 1.2% gain in September, the government said Wednesday. Economists surveyed by MarketWatch had predicted a 0.4% increase. Personal income slumped 0.7% in October after a 0.7% gain in the prior month. This was led by a decrease in government social benefits. The 12-month increase in the PCE index, the Federal Reserve's preferred inflation gauge, slipped to 1.2% in October from 1.4% in the prior month. The core PCE rate that strips out food and energy edged down to 1.3% from 1.5% on an annual basis.
10:31 a.m. Nov. 5, 2020 - By J. Christopher Giancarlo
The future of money should be cashless — with a digital dollar giving faster, easier and cheaper access to your savings Central bank currency promises Americans economic and social benefits and helps the U.S. compete with ChinaCentral bank currency promises Americans economic and social benefits and helps the U.S. compete with China.
8:01 a.m. Oct. 30, 2020 - By Jeffry Bartash
U.S. consumer spending climbs 1.4% in September to cap off strong third quarter Fresh coronavirus outbreak threatens to slow U.S. economic recoveryAmericans spent more in September on goods and services such as new cars, clothing and recreation, a fifth straight increase that underpinned an historic rebound in the economy during the third quarter. Consumer spending rose 1.4% last month.
5:15 a.m. Oct. 29, 2020 - By Jeffry Bartash
GDP soars by record 33.1% annual pace in third quarter, but coronavirus resurgence threatens U.S. economic recovery U.S. economy enters final months of 2020 with less momentumAn unshackled U.S. economy soared by a record 33.1% annual pace in the third quarter as it began to recover from the coronavirus epidemic, but the historic rebound in the summer has already tapered off and a fresh viral outbreak threatens to further choke off growth.
5:34 a.m. Oct. 21, 2020 - By MarketWatch
Stock market struggles for direction at Wednesday's open as coronavirus relief package remains in doubt U.S. stock indexes early Monday were trading near unchanged as investors continued to assess the prospects for a fresh coronavirus relief bill, which is viewed by some experts as crucial to supporting further equity gains. The Dow Jones Industrial Average was down over 35 points, or 0.1%, at 28,285, the S& 500 index was retreating in positive territory at around 3,445, and the Nasdaq Composite Index was edging up less than 0.1% at 11,543. Democratic negotiators and the White House said they would press ahead with talks in aid talks, bypassing a self-imposed deadline for Tuesday that had been proposed by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi over the weekend. In economic reports, investors will watch for an account of business conditions in the Federal Reserve's districts at 2 p.m. Eastern Time.
5:34 a.m. Oct. 21, 2020 - By MarketWatch
Stock market struggles for direction at Wednesday's open as coronavirus relief package remains in doubt U.S. stock indexes early Monday were trading near unchanged as investors continued to assess the prospects for a fresh coronavirus relief bill, which is viewed by some experts as crucial to supporting further equity gains. The Dow Jones Industrial Average was down over 35 points, or 0.1%, at 28,285, the S& 500 index was retreating in positive territory at around 3,445, and the Nasdaq Composite Index was edging up less than 0.1% at 11,543. Democratic negotiators and the White House said they would press ahead with talks in aid talks, bypassing a self-imposed deadline for Tuesday that had been proposed by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi over the weekend. In economic reports, investors will watch for an account of business conditions in the Federal Reserve's districts at 2 p.m. Eastern Time.
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