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Home Furnishings

10:48 a.m. Nov. 6, 2020 - By Tomi Kilgore
Haverty Furniture to pay special dividend of $2 a shareHaverty Furniture Companies Inc. said Friday it will pay a special cash dividend of $2.00 a share. The stock was down 1.9% in afternoon trading, but was down 2.9% prior to a trading halt for news. The home furnishings retailer said the special dividend, as well as the regular quarterly dividend of 20 cents a share, will be payable on Dec. 9 to shareholders of business on Nov. 23. "Our board of directors authorized several steps taken earlier this year to ensure our liquidity due to the uncertainty facing the economy. Our operating results since reopening our stores in May have been very good," said Chief Executive Clarence Smith. "The board's decision today to pay a special dividend, provides returns to Haverty's stockholders, maintains a safeguard against potential headwinds, and preserves capital for potential opportunities." Based on current stock prices, the stock's regular dividend yield is 3.11%, compared with the implied yield for the SPDR S&P Retail ETF of 1.14% and the implied yield for the S&P 500 of 1.63%. Haverty's stock has rallied 27.6% year to date, while the S&P 500 has gained 8.5%.
11:50 a.m. Sept. 29, 2020 - By Aisha Al-Muslim
U.S. retail bankruptcies, store closures hit record in first halfRetail bankruptcies, liquidations and store closings in the U.S. reached records in the first half of 2020 as the Covid-19 pandemic accelerated industry changes, particularly the shift to online shopping, according to according to a report by professional-services firm BDO USA LLP.
9:28 a.m. Sept. 24, 2020 - By Ed Yardeni
Why the U.S. economy will soon recover and get back to the good old days of 2019 Ed Yardeni: ‘Almost everyone in the U.S. last year was doing better than ever’ Ed Yardeni: ‘Almost everyone in the U.S. last year was doing better than ever.’
10:06 a.m. June 4, 2020 - By Ciara Linnane
Coronavirus update: Global case tally climbs above 6.6 million and California reports a rise in infections amid protests and reopening Amazon is adding to its fleet of cargo jets at a time when aircraft values are depressed; Michaels Cos. earnings fall way shortThe number of confirmed cases of the coronavirus that causes COVID-19 rose past 6.6 million on Thursday, and California reported a rise in infections after weeks of slowing, raising concerns that the protests at the death of George Floyd, and the reopening of certain counties, are helping spread the illness.
4:42 a.m. June 4, 2020 - By Ciara Linnane
Tuesday Morning secures $25 million DIP loan from B. Riley unit as part of Chapter 11 proceedingsTuesday Morning Corp. said Thursday it has obtained a commitment from a B. Riley Financial unit for $25 million of debtor-in-possession funding to support operations during Chapter 11 bankruptcy. The Dallas-based home furnishings retailer said the funding is part of its $100 million DIP agreement with existing lenders. The company is seeking to restructure under Chapter 11 after COVID-19-related store closures slammed its business. "This additional capital is an important milestone as it provides significant liquidity for us to continue operations throughout the reorganization process," Chief Executive Steve Becker said in a statement.
2:15 p.m. May 27, 2020 - By Ciara Linnane
Coronavirus update: Global death toll climbs above 353,000; U.S. deaths surpass 100,000 Domino’s Pizza and Papa John’s enjoy strong sales bump, while Ralph Lauren’s sales falter with stores closedThe number of deaths from the coronavirus that causes COVID-19 rose above 353,000 on Wednesday, as the World Health Organization said the Americas are at the center of the pandemic following surges in infections in Brazil, Peru, Chile and others in the past few days.
2:40 a.m. May 27, 2020 - By Tomi Kilgore
Tuesday Morning declares bankruptcy, to close 33% of its stores in the reorganizationShares of Tuesday Morning Corp. plunged 39% toward a record low in premarket trading Wednesday, after the discount home furnishings retailer said it has filed for bankruptcy, as the prolonged closure of its stores amid the COVID-19 pandemic created an "insurmountable financial hurdle." The company said it has obtained $100 million in debtor-in-possession financing so it can continue operations during the bankruptcy. The company said plans to permanently close about 230 of its 687 total stores, or 33%, as part of the reorganization. Tuesday Morning said it had initially closed all of its stores due to the pandemic, but has reopened about 80% of the stores, and over 7,300 employees have returned to work. The bankruptcy comes a little over a week after fellow retailer . The stock has plummeted 86.7% year to date through Tuesday, while the SPDR S&P Retail ETF has dropped 12.5% and the S&P 500 has shed 7.4%.
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