Bulletin
Investor Alert

London Markets Open in:

Topics

Interest Rates

Video

Strategizing for 2022

  • Strategizing for 2022 Strategizing for 2022 9:52
    3 market risks to watch out for this year 3 market risks to watch out for this year 3:08
    How the Government Creates Stimulus Money How the Government Creates Stimulus Money 4:52
3:00 a.m. Nov. 29, 2021 - Barrons.com
Strategizing for 2022TD Ameritrade's JJ Kinahan warns of what could cause additional selling pressure as we approach year-end. Plus, Jason Pride of Glenmede discusses how he's positioning his portfolio to prepare for 2022.
11:11 a.m. Nov. 22, 2021 - By Christine Idzelis
Dow clings to gains as U.S. stocks end mostly lower Monday after Biden picks Powell as Fed ChairThe Dow Jones Industrial Average closed slightly higher Monday, clinging to gains after President Joe Biden announced that he picked Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell to serve a second term. The Dow gained less than 0.1%, while the Nasdaq Composite , a technology-heavy index viewed as sensitive to moves in interest rates, closed about 1.3% lower, and the S&P 500 slipped about 0.3%, according to preliminary data from FactSet. Although the S&P 500 slipped slightly, the index's financial sector rose more than 1%, FactSet data show. Shares of Wall Street banks rallied Monday, with Wells Fargo & Co. rising about 3% and Goldman Sachs Group Inc. , JPMorgan Chase & Co. and Morgan Stanley all rising more than 2%, preliminary data from FactSet show. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note rose 9 basis points to 1.625%, according to Dow Jones Market Data.
10:46 a.m. Nov. 22, 2021 - By Christine Idzelis
U.S. stock indexes trade mixed late afternoon Monday after Biden picks Powell to lead FedU.S. stock indexes were trading mixed heading toward the closing bell Monday, with the S&P 500 and Dow Jones Industrial Average each climbing higher while the Nasdaq Composite was down, after the White House announced earlier in the day that Federal Reserve Chairman to serve a second term. The Dow was up 0.8%, the S&P 500 was 0.6% higher and the Nasdaq was off about 0.2%, according to FactSet data, at last check. President Joe Biden's nominations of Powell to lead the Fed as Chair and Fed Gov. Lael Brainard to fill the position of Vice Chair, must be confirmed by the Senate. A sharp rise in shares of Wall Street banks Goldman Sachs Group Inc. and JPMorgan Chase & Co. helped fuel the Dow's rise Monday afternoon. Meanwhile, the technology-laden Nasdaq, seen as sensitive to interest rates moves, slid as the yield on the 10-year Treasury note rose to around 1.62%.
3:19 a.m. Nov. 10, 2021 - By Tomi Kilgore
GE's stock adds to gains after launching offer to buy back up to $23 billion in debtShare of General Electric Co. rose 1.0% in premarket trading Wednesday, after closing the previous session at a five-month high, following the industrial conglomerate's announcement that it launched tender offers to buy back up to $23 billion in outstanding debt. The company said it is using proceeds from the of its GE Capital Aviation Services (GECAS) business with AerCap Holdings N.V. , in which GE received more than $23 billion in cash and 111.5 million AerCap shares. The debt GE is offering to buy includes maturities from 2022 to 2050 and with interest rates ranging from 0.8% to 7.7%. The announcement comes after GE's stock rallied 2.7% on Tuesday after the company announced . The stock has climbed 28.8% year to date through Tuesday while the S&P 500 has gained 24.7%.
9:31 a.m. Nov. 4, 2021 - By Tomi Kilgore
Bank stocks take a broad beating as Treasury yields fall in wake of Fed taper talkFinancial stocks were suffering a broad beating Thursday, as in the wake of the Federal Reserve's detailing of its , and as the Bank of England held off on an expected rate hike. The SPDR Financial Select Sector ETF dropped 2.0% with 61 of 65 equity components losing ground. within the Dow Jones Industrial Average , Goldman Sachs Group Inc.'s stock was the biggest drag, as it fell $13.49, or 3.2%. Elsewhere, shares of JPMorgan Chase & Co. lost 2.3%, Bank of America Corp. dropped 3.0%, Citigroup Inc. slid 3.4% and Wells Fargo & Go. shed 2.9%. Meanwhile, the yield on the 10-year Treasury note declined 6.0 basis points to 1.519%. Lower long-term interest rates could hurt bank profits, as the spread between what banks can earn on longer-term assets, such as loans, that are funded with shorter-term liabilities is narrowed.
2:55 a.m. Oct. 28, 2021 - By William Watts
ECB leaves monetary policy measures unchangedThe European Central Bank, as expected, left its monetary policy measures unchanged Thursday, saying it would continue to purchase assets via its pandemic emergency purchase program at a slower pace than seen in the second and third quarters. The ECB left interest rates unchanged and said it would continue PEPP purchases through at least the end of March. Purchases under the separate Asset Purchase Program will continue at a pace of 20 billion euros ($23.2 billion) a month. ECB President Christine Lagarde will hold a news conference at 8:30 a.m. Eastern, in which economists expect her to push back against market pricing of rate increases in 2022 and 2023.
11:15 a.m. Oct. 27, 2021 - By Mark Decambre
Dow closes 266 points lower, halts string of gains as Nasdaq ekes out 3rd straight rise and Treasurys log steepest yield slide in 3 monthsThe Dow and S&P 500 closed lower Wednesday, ending a string of gains for the equity benchmarks that have been mostly rising to all-time highs on the back of upbeat quarterly results from American corporations. The Dow Jones Industrial Average closed down 266 points, or 0.7%, at about 35,491, the S&P 500 index closed 0.5% lower at 4,552. The Nasdaq Composite Index finished the session nearly unchanged at 15,236, as a retreat in yields for the 10-year Treasury note and the 30-year Treasury bond hit lows not seen since July 19, according to Dow Jones Market Data. Lower yields can buoy yield-sensitive sectors like information technology and investment factors like growth. In corporate results, Microsoft Corp. reported quarterly earnings that shot over $20 billion for the first time, late Tuesday, which helped to limit declines in the broader market and supported the tech sector on Wednesday. Microsoft shares rose 4.2% to $323.17, notching a record close, according to Dow Jones Market Data. Meanwhile, in a surprise move Wednesday, the Bank of Canada said it would abruptly end its bond-buying program and warned of prolonged inflation through 2023, while also signaling it may hike interest rates sooner than expected, the second quarter of 2022.
9:20 a.m. Oct. 27, 2021 - By Mark Decambre
Long-dated Treasury yields on track for biggest daily drop in over 3 monthsLong-dated Treasury yields on Wednesday were experiencing the biggest slide in months, with buying in long-dated bond yields fueled by concerns about the economic outlook, against expectations that the Federal Reserve will commence the reduction of monthly asset purchases, as early as next week, with an eye toward eventually hiking interest rates, which currently stand at a range between 0% and 0.25%. The 10-year Treasury note yield was 8.3 basis points lower at around 1.538% at last check Wednesday, compared with its 3 p.m. Eastern Time levels. The daily slide for the benchmark Treasury rate, used to price everything from mortgages to car loans, would mark the steepest one-day slide since July 19, according to Dow Jones Market Data. Meanwhile, the 30-year Treasury bond rate was at 1.953%, off 9.8 basis points, which would also mark its sharpest yield slide since July 19.
2:53 a.m. Sept. 9, 2021 - By William Watts
European Central Bank to 'moderately' slow pace of asset purchases under PEPPThe European Central Bank on Thursday indicated it would conduct asset purchases under its pandemic emergency purchase program, or PEPP, at a "moderately lower pace" after accelerating purchases in recent quarters. "Based on a joint assessment of financing conditions and the inflation outlook, the Governing Council judges that favorable financing conditions can be maintained with a moderately lower pace of net asset purchases under the PEPP than in the previous two quarters," the ECB said in a statement following a meeting of its Governing Council. The ECB said PEPP purchases would continue with an envelope of 1.85 trillion euros through at least the end of March 2022. The ECB left key interest rates unchanged, as expected. ECB President Christine Lagarde will hold a news conference at 2:30 p.m. Frankfurt time, or 8:30 a.m. Eastern.
3:46 a.m. Aug. 27, 2021 - By Greg Robb
Fed's Harker backs starting taper 'sooner rather than later'Philadelphia Fed President Patrick Harker said he wanted to move toward tapering asset purchases "sooner rather than later." In an interview with CNBC, Harker said that he didn't think the $120 billion per month of asset purchases were "doing a whole lot right now." The economy is being held back by supply issues that lower interest rates can't solve, he said. Harker said he was still supportive of "moving the taper along" despite potential damage to the economy from the coronavirus delta variant. The Philadelphia Fed president said the rapid acceleration in inflation seen this year "may not be so transitory." Contacts in his district have said supply chain disruptions facing the home-building sector "won't be solved anytime soon," he said. Harker won't be a voting member of the Fed's interest-rate committee until 2023.
3:11 a.m. Aug. 27, 2021 - By Greg Robb
Fed's Bostic says job data 'in coming months' will decide when to start taperingThe U.S. economy is "very close" to the substantial progress benchmark needed to start tapering its asset purchases but "a lot depends on what happens in the next couple of months," said Atlanta Fed President Raphael Bostic on Friday. In an interview on CNBC, Bostic said he was focused on conditions in the labor market. If job gains continue at the pace seen earlier in the summer, then that will satisfy the conditions for making substantial progress, he said. This suggests Bostic may want to wait until the November meeting to announce the slowing down of purchases. More hawkish Fed officials are pressing for a September announcement. Once the tapering program started, Bostic said he wanted to reduce the purchases "as quickly as possible." The Fed is buying $120 billion per month of Treasurys and mortgage-backed securities to hold down long-term interest rates. Bostic said he didn't think the tapering would upset financial markets. Fed Chairman Jerome Powell will speak about the economy at 10 a.m. Eastern.
6:27 a.m. Aug. 20, 2021 - By MarketWatch
3 market risks to watch out for this yearMike Schumacher, head of macro strategy at Wells Fargo Securities, describes three underappreciated risks that investors should keep an eye on.
8:30 a.m. Aug. 11, 2021 - By Greg Robb
Fed's Kaplan says central bank should announce taper plans in SeptemberDallas Fed President Rob Kaplan said Wednesday that he will press his colleagues at the central bank to announce a plan to taper bond purchases at its next meeting in late September. In an interview on CNBC, Kaplan said he wanted the slow down in purchases to start in October and last until June. Kaplan has been pressing his colleagues to start to pull back on its $120 billion in monthly bond and mortgage-related securities since late April. Asked if he had a lot of support from his colleagues for his position, Kaplan said there was a "range of views" but the committee is in a much better place than it was two months. Kaplan said the asset purchases don't help the economy now because the trouble is with the supply of goods and workers. Asset purchases work best to spur demand, he said. Kaplan ducked questions about whether his timetable meant that the Fed will raise interest rates as soon as next year. He said he was "divorcing" his views on tapering from his decisions on when to hike rates.
11:08 a.m. July 28, 2021 - By Mark Decambre
Dow, S&P 500 log back-to-back losses as Fed says economy has 'made progress' from COVID but not enoughThe Nasdaq Composite on Wednededay ended solidly higher but the broader market closed weaker as the Federal Reserve signaled that the countdown has begun on scaling back its massive support for the U.S. economy, but a decision still appeared a ways away. The Dow Jones Industrial Average closed down by about 128 points, or 0.4%, at 34,930, the S&P 500 index was virtually flat, but in negative territory, to end at around 4,400. The benchmarks declined for the second straight session. The Nasdaq , meanwhile, closed up 0.7% at roughly 14,762. The Fed kept interest rates at a range between 0% and 0.25%, as expected, and Powell indicated that the central bank was in no immediate rush to scale back on its monthly purchases of $120 billion in Treasurys and mortgage-backed securities, which the Chairman said would continue until "substantial further progress" was made toward the Fed's goals of low unemployment and inflation reaching 2%. The Fed statement said that the rate-setting Federal Open Market Committe "will continue to assess progress in coming meetings." Meanwhile, the small-capitalization Russell 2000 index finished sharply higher, up around 1.6%, at last check. Separately, the 10-year Treasury note was up 2.4 basis points at 1.259%.
3:00 a.m. July 22, 2021 - By William Watts
ECB tweaks forward guidance in line with new, symmetric inflation targetThe European Central Bank, as expected, left interest rates and its program of asset purchases unchanged Thursday, while tweaking its forward guidance on policy to put it in line with its newly adopted inflation target. The ECB earlier this month completed a strategic review, adopting a symmetric 2% inflation target in place of its previous aim of keeping inflation near but just below 2%. In a statement following its policy meeting, the Governing Council said it expects "key ECB interest rates to remain at their present or lower levels until it sees inflation reaching two per cent well ahead of the end of its projection horizon and durably for the rest of the projection horizon, and it judges that realized progress in underlying inflation is sufficiently advanced to be consistent with inflation stabilizing at 2% over the medium term." The ECB said this "may also imply a transitory period in which inflation is moderately above target."
3:35 a.m. July 8, 2021 - By Tomi Kilgore
Financial stocks set for broad selloff as Treasury yields keep fallingThe financial sector is bracing for a broad selloff Thursday, amid weakness in the broader market and continued declines in Treasury yields. The SPDR Financial Select Sector ETF slumped 1.8% in premarket trading, enough to pace the declines in all of the SPDR ETFs tracking the S&P 500's 11 sectors. Among the financial ETF's most heavily weighted components, shares of Berkshire Hathaway Inc. fell 1.4%, J.P. Morgan Chase & Co. shed 2.1%, Bank of America Corp. dropped 2.6%, Wells Fargo & Co. gave up 2.7% and Citigroup Inc. slid 2.4%. The declines come as S&P 500 futures slumped 1.4% and the yield on the 10-year Treasury note was down 4.8 basis points to a 5-month low of 1.271%, amid concerns over future economic growth. Falling longer-term interest rates can hurt bank profits, as they reduce the spread banks earn on longer-term assets, such as loans, which are funded by shorter-term liabilities.
9:52 a.m. June 25, 2021 - By Tomi Kilgore
Financial stocks lead S&P 500 sectors higher as inflation data boosts Treasury yieldsThe financial sector was the best performing of the S&P 500 11 stock sectors Friday, after upbeat economic data pushed Treasury yields higher. The SPDR Financial Select Sector ETF rallied 1.2% in afternoon trading, with 61 of 65 equity components trading higher, while the S&P 500 edged up 0.3%. Among the ETFs top holdings, shares of Berkshire Hathaway Inc. tacked on 0.8%, J.P. Morgan Chase & Co. gained 1.0%, Bank of America Corp. advanced 2.1%, Wells Fargo & Co. climbed 2.8% and Citigroup Inc. edged up 0.4%. The sector's rally comes as rose 5.4 basis points to 1.541% after data showing the in May marked a third straight big increase. Bank profits can benefit from higher longer-term interest rates, because that can increase the spread between what banks earn on longer-term assets, such as loans, that are funded by shorter-term liabilities.
4:14 a.m. May 7, 2021 - By Tomi Kilgore
J.P. Morgan, Goldman Sachs stocks lead Dow losers as yields fall after disappointing jobs data Bank stocks took a dive in premarket trading Friday, as Treasury yields sank in the wake of disappointing government jobs data. J.P. Morgan Chase & Co.'s stock fell 1.6% to pace the Dow Jones Industrial Average's early decliners, followed by the 1.4% drop in Goldman Sachs Group Inc.'s stock . The implied price declines of those two stocks would shave about 50 points off the Dow's price, while Dow futures declined 16 points, or 0.1%. Elsewhere, shares of Bank of America Corp. were down 1.7%, Citigroup Inc. shed 1.4% and Wells Fargo & Co. gave up 1.3%, while the SPDR Financial Select Sector ETF was down 1.1%. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note dropped 4.7 basis points to a 2-month low of 1.515%, after the and the unemployment rate surprisingly rose. Lower longer-term interest rates can hurt bank profits, as it narrows the spread they can earn on longer-term assets, like loans, that are funded with shorter-term liabilities.
11:20 a.m. May 5, 2021 - By Greg Robb
Fed Vice Chairman Clarida says it is not time yet to talk about taperingFederal Reserve Vice Chairman Richard Clarida on Wednesday said it was not time yet to begin conversations about possibly scaling back the central bank's asset purchases. The Fed is buying $120 billion per month of Treasurys and mortgage-related securities as well as keeping interest rates close to zero in order to stimulate the economy. The Fed has said it wants to see "substantial further progress" on its goals of full employment and stable inflation before tapering. Asked when the Fed should start "talking about talking about" tapering, Clarida replied: "We don't think so right now." Dallas Fed President Robert Kaplan said earlier this week it was time to start the discussion about tapering. Several Fed officials speaking on Wednesday have all disagreed with Kaplan. "We'll get more data -and as we move through the year- we will be able to make a judgement on 'substantial further progress,' but we're not there yet," Clarida said.
4:30 a.m. May 5, 2021 - By Greg Robb
Fed's Evans says chances of persistently higher inflation are 'remote'The chances that the $2.8 trillion stimulus measures passed by Congress since December will overheat the economy and generate higher inflation are remote, said Chicago Fed President Charles Evans on Wednesday. Inflation is likely to pick up in coming months as people resume normal activities and some bottlenecks emerge but simulations performed by economists at the Chicago Fed see inflation topping out at less than a full percentage point and dissipating in two or three years, Evans said in a speech to the Levy Economics Institute of Bard College. "We still have some ways to go before we meet our goals" of full employment and stable 2% average inflation, Evans said. As a result, Fed policy "is likely on hold for some time," he added. Labor market conditions required to move interest rates off zero or to start to taper the $120 billion in monthly asset purchases "will not be met for a while," he said.
2:54 a.m. April 22, 2021 - By William Watts
European Central Bank leaves rates, bond-buying program unchangedThe European Central Bank, as expected, left interest rates unchanged and made no changes to its bond-buying efforts on Thursday. The ECB said the Governing Council decided to "reconfirm its very accommodative monetary policy stance." The central bank said it would continue to buy bonds under its 1.85 trillion euro pandemic emergency purchase program until at least the end of March 2022, while net purchases under its asset purchase program would continue at a monthly pace of 20 billion euros. The ECB said PEPP purchases, as decided at the ECB's previous meeting, will continue at a significantly faster pace over the current quarter. Interest rates were left unchanged, with the main refinancing rate at 0% and the deposit rate at minus 0.5%. ECB President Christine Lagarde will hold a news conference at 2:30 p.m. Frankfurt time, or 8:30 a.m. Eastern.
2:01 a.m. April 14, 2021 - By Tomi Kilgore
J.P. Morgan net profit soars 5-fold to $14.3 billion and revenue tops expectations, but stock slipsShares of J.P. Morgan Chase & Co. fell 1.1% in premarket trading Wednesday, even as the banking giant reported first-quarter profit and revenue that beat expectations, as results benefited from an improving economy and credit reserve releases of $5.2 billion. Net income rose to $14.30 billion, or $4.50 a share, from $2.87 billion, or 78 cents a share, in the same period a year ago. Excluding non-recurring items, such as credit reserve releases, adjusted EPS came to $3.31, above the FactSet consensus of $3.09. Net revenue rose 14% to $33.1 billion, above the FactSet consensus of $30.5 billion. Consumer and community banking revenue fell 6% to $12.52 billion, matching the FactSet consensus, while corporate and investment bank revenue jumped 46% to $14.6 billion to top expectations of $12.6 billion. Net interest income fell 11% to $13.0 billion, driven primarily by lower interest rates, to miss expectations of $13.2 billion. "With all of the stimulus spending, potential infrastructure spending, continued Quantitative Easing, strong consumer and business balance sheets and euphoria around the potential end of the pandemic, we believe that the economy has the potential to have extremely robust, multi-year growth," said Chief Executive Jamie Dimon. The stock has run up 21.3% year to date through Tuesday, while the SPDR Financial Select Sector ETF has tacked on 4.5% and the Dow Jones Industrial Average has gained 10.0%.
3:11 a.m. March 31, 2021 - By Ciara Linnane
UPDATE: Goodyear announces offering of $1 billion of high-yield bonds, amends credit agreementThe Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. said Wednesday it has commenced a $1 billion offering of high-yield 10-year and 12-year bonds. Proceeds will be used along with cash on hand to redeem in full all outstanding $1 billion 5.125% senior notes due 2023. There are 20 banks underwriting the deal, led by Citigroup and Barclays. Goodyear announced a deal to acquire rival Cooper Tire & Rubber Co. in February in a $2.8 billion deal. Separately, the company said it has reached an agreement with JPMorgan Chase Bank NA and other lenders to amend and restate a credit agreement relating to its U.S. first lien revolving credit facility. The agreement will raise the principal it can borrow to $2.75 billion, lowers interest rates and extends the maturity date. Goodyear shares were down 3.64 premarket, but have gained 61% in the year to date, while the S&P 500 has gained 5%.
4:53 a.m. March 19, 2021 - By Alicia H. Munnell
Are annuities a good deal? You probably won’t get your money back, but the guarantee of money for life is really valuableYou probably won’t get your money back, but the guarantee of money for life is really valuable
9:33 a.m. March 17, 2021 - By Andrea Riquier
Homebuilder ETFs jump after Fed statementHome-builder exchange-traded funds rallied after the Federal Reserve said it would hold off on raising interest rates at least through the end of 2023. The iShares U.S. Home Construction ETF gained 2.7% in the mid-afternoon, while the SPDR S&P Homebuilders ETF was up 1.2%. The Invesco Dynamic Building & Construction ETF ticked up 0.3%. Home-builder stocks fell in the morning after a disappointing housing-starts report, but rebounded after the central bank released its policy announcement mid-afternoon.
7:35 a.m. March 17, 2021 - MarketWatch.com
Fed faces communication challenge as doubts mount about its easy policy stance: live blog In wake of vaccine-rollout and $1.9 trillion stimulus, markets think first Fed interest-rate hike is no longer years awayThe Federal Reserve will release its latest views on the economy and the ‘dot-plot’ view of interest rate policy at 2pm Eastern. Fed Chairman Jerome Powell will follow with a press conference a half-hour later.
10:15 a.m. March 12, 2021 - By Mark Hulbert
The threat retirees face from higher inflation Inflation expectations have risen over the last couple of monthsInflation expectations have risen over the last couple of months
5:33 a.m. March 12, 2021 - By Tomi Kilgore
M.D.C. Holdings stock sinks after BofA turns bearish, citing valuation and affordability concernsShares of M.D.C. Holdings Inc. sank 5.9% in morning trading Friday, after BofA Securities analyst John Lovallo turned bearish on the homebuilder, citing concerns over valuation and near-term housing affordability. He cut his rating to underperform from neutral, while keeping his price target at $63. "We view M.D.C. as a well-run, well-positioned homebuilder but believe the year-to-date run in the stock fully encompasses these positive, particularly considering the affordability challenges we expect in the months ahead," Lovallo wrote in a note to clients. The stock has rallied 26.4% year to date, and closed at a 16-year high on Wednesday. Lovallo said affordability could be hurt by rising raw materials prices and interest rates, and as coming stimulus measures support further gains in home prices. M.D.C.'s stock selloff comes as the iShares U.S. Home Construction ETF shed 2.3%, while the S&P 500 fell 0.5%. Among M.D.C.'s more active peers, shares of D.R. Horton Inc. slid 4.4%, Lennar Corp. lost 4.0%, PulteGroup Inc. declined 3.2% and Toll Brothers Inc. gave up 3.7%.
5:40 a.m. March 11, 2021 - By Sunny Oh
Treasury yields bounce off lows as supply loomsU.S. government bond yields bounced off their intraday lows on Thursday as investors looked to make room for issuance of new 30-year Treasury bonds and investment-grade corporate debt issuance from Verizon. The 10-year Treasury note yield rose 2 basis points to 1.540%, off their low of around 1.475%, while the 30-year bond yield climbed 4.7 basis points to 2.289%. Bond prices move inversely to yields. Broker-dealers typically bid yields higher to attract bond buyers ahead of a Treasury auction. And banks tasked with drumming up demand and selling corporate bonds will sometimes sell long-term Treasury futures to offset the risk that interest rates will rise and weigh on the prices of the debt during the issuance process.
7:15 a.m. March 7, 2021 - By Robert Powell
Don’t stop investing in bonds How to find the right bonds for your needsHow to find the right bonds for your needs
6:08 a.m. Feb. 24, 2021 - By Paul Brandus
Higher interest rates could mean more cash for seniors Low interest rates are a double-edged swordLow interest rates are a double-edged sword
9:15 a.m. Feb. 12, 2021 - By Mark Hulbert
The place of junk bonds in a retirement portfolio A historical review of high-yield bonds’ costs and benefitsA historical review of high-yield bonds’ costs and benefits
10:47 a.m. Feb. 9, 2021 - By Alicia H. Munnell
What will low interest rates do to retirement savings? If rates continue to hover around zero, people will need to save large amountsIf rates continue to hover around zero, people will need to save large amounts
9:15 a.m. Jan. 29, 2021 - By Mark Hulbert
Is the 60:40 portfolio really dead? The future of the traditional stock-bond portfolio in a low-rate environmentThe future of the traditional stock-bond portfolio in a low-rate environment
3:02 a.m. Jan. 21, 2021 - By William Watts
European Central Bank leaves rates, bond-buying program unchangedThe European Central Bank, as expected, made no changes to interest rates or its asset-buying program on Thursday after moving last month to bolster its efforts to support the eurozone economy. The ECB said its Governing Council left its deposit rate at negative 0.5% and its main refinancing rate at 0%. The central bank also affirmed it would maintain the "envelope" for its pandemic emergency purchase program at 1.85 trillion euros and would continue monthly purchases under the program until at least the end of March 2022. The ECB added that if "favorable financing conditions can be maintained with asset purchase flows that do not exhaust the envelope over the net purchase horizon of the PEPP, the envelope need not be used in full. Equally, the envelope can be recalibrated if required to maintain favorable financing conditions to help counter the negative pandemic shock to the path of inflation." The ECB also will continue its asset purchase program at a pace of 20 billion euros a month. ECB President Christine Lagarde will hold a news conference at 2:30 p.m. Frankfurt time, or 8:30 a.m. Eastern.
6:05 a.m. Jan. 9, 2021 - By David Blanchett
How retirement planning needs to change in 2021 Considering annuities, insurance, new investments and delaying Social Security?Considering annuities, insurance, new investments and delaying Social Security?
10:15 a.m. Jan. 5, 2021 - By Alex Mashinsky
3 steps to take in your 20s to make sure you see retirement How to reach financial independence when interest is 0% and there’s no return on bondsGetting to financial independence in a world with 0% rates and no returns on bonds
6:42 a.m. Dec. 17, 2020 - By Louis D’Anella
These are the last days of small government and investors need to prepare for ‘neofiscalism’ Government is going to take a bigger role in the economy and that will affect your investment decisionsGovernment is going to take a bigger role in the economy and that will affect your investment decisions.
11:04 a.m. Dec. 16, 2020 - By Mark DeCambre
Nasdaq ends at record, S&P 500 narrowly misses closing high as Fed emphasizes 0% interest rates through 2023 U.S. stocks finished at or near records on Wednesday, though the Dow closed nearly flat, as the Federal Reserve did little to indicate a change of the regime of ultralow interest rates amid the pandemic. The Fed said it was optimistic on the current recovery but emphasized that the outlook for the economy will hinge on how the U.S. deals with the worst viral outbreak in more than a century. Federal-funds rates were held at a range between 0% and 0.25%, as expected, as Washington tries to hammer out an agreement on another round of financial aid to combat the economic harm from the coronavirus. The central bank increased its GDP forecast but didn't adjust its $120 billion asset purchases, as had been expected by some Fed watchers. "Together these measures will ensure that monetary policy will continue to deliver powerful support for the economy until the recovery is complete," Fed Chairman Jerome Powell said at a news conference after Wednesday's statement was released. "A big yawn," is how Michael Arone, chief investment strategist at State Street Global Advisors, described the policy update to MarketWatch, immediately after the release. The Dow Jones Industrial Average closed down by about 44 points, or 0.2%, at around 30,155; the S&P 500 index rose 0.2% to 3,701, just shy of its Dec. 8 closing record at 3,702.25' while the Nasdaq Composite Index booked a 0.5% rise to a record close at about 12,658. In economic reports, a retail sales report showed that the economy may be slowing as coronavirus cases surge. U.S. retail sales dropped a seasonally adjusted 1.1% in November from the prior month. The data and Fed update come as congressional lawmakers were hammering out a roughly $900 billion deal that was expected to include another round of direct payments to households, The Wall Street Journal reported. In corporate news, Shares of Facebook Inc. were in focus after it launched a PR assault against Apple Inc. claiming the iPhone maker's upcoming mobile operating system update will hurt small businesses. Bond yields also edged higher, with the 10-year Treasury note yielding 0.92%.
9:23 a.m. Dec. 16, 2020 - By Mark DeCambre
Dow adds to slight losses Wednesday as Fed says path of economy next year depends on coronavirusU.S. stocks traded off their highest levels of the session on Wednesday, and losses deepened for the Dow, as investors parsed the last policy update of 2020 from the Federal Reserve, which did little to indicate a change of the regime of ultralow interest rates amid the pandemic. The Fed said it was optimistic on the current recovery but noted that the outlook for the economy will hinge on how the U.S. deals with the worst viral outbreak in more than a century. Federal-funds rates were held at a range between 0% and 0.25%, as expected, as Washington tries to hammer out an agreement on another round of financial aid to combat the economic harm from the coronavirus. The central bank increased its GDP forecast but did little to adjust its asset purchases, as had been expected by some Fed watchers. "A big yawn," is how Michael Arone, chief investment strategist at State Street Global Advisors, described the policy update to MarketWatch, immediately after the release. The Dow Jones Industrial Average was trading of by about 100 points, or 0.3%, lower at 30,104, the S&P 500 index slipped into negative territory at 3,693, while the Nasdaq Composite Index pared its gains, up 0.2% at 12,618. Fed Chairman Jerome Powell will host a news conference at 2:30 p.m.
Browse topics:

Filter results by

Location

Us (229)

Europe (36)

Eu (25)

Asia Pacific (24)

China (9)

Japan (9)

Link to MarketWatch's Slice.