Bulletin
Investor Alert

New York Markets Open in:

Topics

Real Estate

Video

Perspectives on Prices from Beverly Hills to Europe

  • Perspectives on Prices from Beverly Hills to Europe Perspectives on Prices from Beverly Hills to Europe 9:26
    Stock Summer Swoon Coming? Stock Summer Swoon Coming? 9:15
    Promise on the Horizon Promise on the Horizon 9:51
    Inside the Fed's Plan to Support Minority Workers Inside the Fed's Plan to Support Minority Workers 6:23
9:31 a.m. Dec. 8, 2021 - By Greg Robb
U.S. likely ran a $193 billion deficit in November versus $145 billion a year earlier, CBO saysThe federal government likely ran a budget deficit of $193 billion in November, up from $145 billion in the same month last year, the Congressional Budget Office estimated Wednesday. The Treasury Department will release the official deficit data on Friday. The U.S. budget deficit hit $2.8 trillion in fiscal year 2021, the second highest on record. The CBO projects the 2022 deficit will narrow to $1.2 billion, in part because the federal government is no longer providing emergency pandemic assistance. For instance, outlays for unemployment compensation fell by $21 billion compared with the same month last year, the CBO said. Cecilia Rouse, chair of the White House council of economic advisers. said Tuesday that the slowdown in government spending will result in an 8.5% contraction in "the fiscal impulse" on the economy in 2022, one of the biggest drops since World War II.
10:02 a.m. Dec. 7, 2021 - By Greg Robb
U.S. consumer credit moderates in OctoberU.S. consumer credit increased $16.9 billion in October, down from a $27.8 billion gain in September, according to Federal Reserve data released Tuesday. Economists had been expecting a $25 billion gain, according to the Wall Street Journal forecast. That's an annual growth rate of 4.7% in October, down from a 7.7% gain in the prior month. Revolving credit, like credit cards, rose 7.8% after an 11.7% gain in September. Nonrevolving credit, typically auto and student loans, rose 3.7% after a 6.5% growth rate in the prior month. This category of credit is much less volatile. It fell briefly at the start of the pandemic before returning to steady growth, although more recently, it has been depressed by the lack of supply of new cars. The data does not include mortgage loans, which is the largest category of household debt.
3:34 a.m. Nov. 17, 2021 - By Jacob Passy
Housing starts slip nearly 1%, falling short of expectations U.S. home builders started construction on homes at a seasonally-adjusted annual rate of 1.52 million in October, representing a 0.7% decrease from the previous month, the U.S. Census Bureau reported Wednesday. Compared with October 2020, housing starts were up 0.4%. The pace of permitting for new housing units increased in October, however. Permitting for new homes occurred at a seasonally-adjusted annual rate of 1.65 million, up 4% from September and 3.4% from a year ago. Economists polled by MarketWatch had expected housing starts to occur at a median pace of 1.63 million and building permits to come in at a median pace of 1.58 million.
3:17 a.m. Oct. 25, 2021 - Barrons.com
Perspectives on Prices from Beverly Hills to EuropeDespite inflation concerns and high valuations, Pimco's Erin Browne discusses her firm's bullish outlook for U.S. stocks while also offering a warning for European investors. Plus, Barron's Carleton English breaks down the big themes from the Milken Conference and Nuveen's Anders Persson offers insight within the world of fixed income.
5:05 a.m. Oct. 21, 2021 - By Jacob Passy
Existing-home sales improve in September, eating up available inventoryExisting-home sales rose 7% on a monthly basis in September, reaching a seasonally-adjusted, annual rate of 6.29 million, the National Association of Realtors said Thursday. Compared to a year ago, though, sales were down roughly 2%. The increase in sales was the result of improved inventory in recent months, which gave buyers more options to choose from and allowed more people to lock in purchases. However, inventory dropped nearly 1% from the previous month as of the end of September, and was down 13% from a year ago.
3:41 a.m. Oct. 19, 2021 - By Jacob Passy
New-home construction subsides as supply-chain and labor problems persistU.S. home builders started construction on homes at a seasonally-adjusted annual rate of 1.56 million in September, representing a 1.6% decrease from the previous month, the U.S. Census Bureau reported Tuesday. Compared with September 2020, housing starts were up 7.4%. The pace of permitting for new housing units also dropped in September. Permitting for new homes occurred at a seasonally-adjusted annual rate of 1.59 million, down 7.7% from August, in line with the rate of permitting from a year ago. Economists polled by MarketWatch had expected housing starts to occur at a pace of 1.61 million and building permits to come in at a pace of 1.67 million. The drop in permits was driven mainly by a decrease in multifamily housing units, though fewer single-family homes were permitted as well. New construction on multifamily buildings also decreased in September, though single-family starts remained flat.
9:46 a.m. Sept. 30, 2021 - By Greg Robb
Yellen throws cold water on trillion-dollar coin solution for debt ceiling stalemateTreasury Secretary Janet Yellen on Thursday said "the only way" to avoid a default on the U.S. debt is for Congress to pass legislation to raise the debt ceiling, throwing cold water on the radical idea of minting a trillion-dollar coin to get around the politically difficult vote. Rep. William Timmons, a Republican of South Carolina, asked Yellen to comment on the idea. He said Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi "gave oxygen" to the proposed trillion-dollar coin when she mentioned it during a press conference on Wednesday. Timmons asked Yellen to "please tell me this is not a legitimate policy proposal." In response, Yellen said: "I believe that the only way to handle the debt ceiling is for Congress to raise it and show the world, financial markets and the public that we're a country that will pay our bills." However, in a question from Rep. Sean Casten, Democrat from Illinois, Yellen said she would support legislation to remove the requirement for a vote on the debt limit by Congress.
3:47 a.m. Sept. 27, 2021 - By Greg Robb
Fed's Rosengren, under scrutiny for 2020 trading activity, to retire on Sept. 30Boston Fed President Eric Rosengren announced Monday he will retire on Sept 30. In a statement, Rosengren said he moved up his long-planned retirement by nine months because of health concerns. Rosengren would have had to retire next June under Fed rules. Rosengren has been criticized for actively trading in real-estate investment trusts in 2020 while the Fed was taking extraordinary steps to keep financial markets stable during the pandemic. Reformers, like the group Better Markets, had called for Rosengren to resign.
5:03 a.m. Sept. 24, 2021 - By Jacob Passy
New home sales jump in August despite record pricesU.S. new-home sales increased 1.5% to an annual rate of 740,000, the government said Friday. The figure equates to how many homes would be sold over a yearlong period of time if the same number were bought in each month based on the rate of sales in July. Compared to a year ago, sales were down 24%.The median forecast of economists polled by MarketWatch was that new home sales would come in at an annual rate of 720,000 for August. The median sales price of new houses sold in August was $390,900, rising slightly from the previous month to reach a new record high.
3:37 a.m. Sept. 21, 2021 - By Jacob Passy
New-home construction improves in August, driven by increase in multifamily buildingU.S. home builders started construction on homes at a seasonally-adjusted annual rate of 1.62 million in August, representing a 3.9% increase from the previous month, the U.S. Census Bureau reported Tuesday. Compared with August 2020, housing starts were up 17.4%. The pace of permitting for new housing units also increased in August. Permitting for new homes occurred at a seasonally-adjusted annual rate of 1.73 million, up 6% from July and 13.5% from a year ago. With both housing starts and building permits, the gains recorded in August were driven by an uptick in multifamily construction activity. Economists polled by MarketWatch had expected housing starts to occur at a pace of 1.55 million and building permits to come in at a pace of 1.62 million.
3:16 a.m. Sept. 16, 2021 - By Tomi Kilgore
Home prices keep rising, but sales fall for the first time in 15 monthsThe median sale price for a home in August rose year-over-year by more than double-digit percentages for the 13th-straight month, but sales fell for the first time in 15 months, according to real estate services company Redfin Corp. The median home-sale price was $380,271 in August, down 1.0% from July but up 16.2% from the same period a year ago, with prices increasing in 83 of the 85 largest metro areas tracked by Redfin. The largest price increases were 36% in Austin, Texas and 25% in Phoenix, Arizona, while the two areas of declines were Milwaukee, Wisconsin (down 1.6%) and Bridgeport, Connecticut (down 1.1%). "When it comes to home prices in this market, what goes up stays up," said Redfin Chief Economist Daryl Fairweather. Meanwhile, seasonally-adjusted home sales fell 1.4% from July and 6.0% from a year ago, with sales declining in 44 of the 85 largest metro areas. The biggest sales declines were 23% in New Orleans, Louisiana and 16% in Salt Lake City, Utah, while the biggest gains were 65% in New York, New York and 47% in Honolulu, Hawaii. Redfin's stock has tumbled 29.4% year to date, while the iShares U.S. Home Construction ETF has run up 24.8% and the S&P 500 has rallied 19.3%.
9:36 a.m. Aug. 27, 2021 - By Greg Robb
Fed's Clarida, echoing Powell, backs start of taper this yearThe number two official at the Federal Reserve on Friday backed the start of a taper of bond purchases later this year, in comments that largely echoed Fed Chairman Jerome Powell's Jackson Hole speech. In an interview with CNBC, Fed Vice Chairman Richard Clarida said he expects the trend of "robust" job gains seen this summer to continue and "if that happens I would also support commencing reduction in the pace of our purchases later this year." The economy has added an average of over 800,000 per month over the last three months. Clarida said it wouldn't take the strong pace of 800,000 jobs per month for the Fed to reach its benchmark for tapering of "substantial" progress in the labor markets. "I don't think it takes 800,000 per month, but robust gains," Clarida said.
3:46 a.m. Aug. 27, 2021 - By Greg Robb
Fed's Harker backs starting taper 'sooner rather than later'Philadelphia Fed President Patrick Harker said he wanted to move toward tapering asset purchases "sooner rather than later." In an interview with CNBC, Harker said that he didn't think the $120 billion per month of asset purchases were "doing a whole lot right now." The economy is being held back by supply issues that lower interest rates can't solve, he said. Harker said he was still supportive of "moving the taper along" despite potential damage to the economy from the coronavirus delta variant. The Philadelphia Fed president said the rapid acceleration in inflation seen this year "may not be so transitory." Contacts in his district have said supply chain disruptions facing the home-building sector "won't be solved anytime soon," he said. Harker won't be a voting member of the Fed's interest-rate committee until 2023.
5:05 a.m. Aug. 23, 2021 - By Jacob Passy
Existing-home sales jump 2% in July as inventory of properties for sale growsExisting-home sales rose 2% in July from the month prior, the National Association of Realtors . Sales occurred at a seasonally-adjusted annual rate of 5.99 million. Compared to July 2020, sales were up 1.5%. The total inventory of homes for sales rose 7.3% on a monthly basis, though it's still down significantly from a year ago.
8:30 a.m. Aug. 11, 2021 - By Greg Robb
Fed's Kaplan says central bank should announce taper plans in SeptemberDallas Fed President Rob Kaplan said Wednesday that he will press his colleagues at the central bank to announce a plan to taper bond purchases at its next meeting in late September. In an interview on CNBC, Kaplan said he wanted the slow down in purchases to start in October and last until June. Kaplan has been pressing his colleagues to start to pull back on its $120 billion in monthly bond and mortgage-related securities since late April. Asked if he had a lot of support from his colleagues for his position, Kaplan said there was a "range of views" but the committee is in a much better place than it was two months. Kaplan said the asset purchases don't help the economy now because the trouble is with the supply of goods and workers. Asset purchases work best to spur demand, he said. Kaplan ducked questions about whether his timetable meant that the Fed will raise interest rates as soon as next year. He said he was "divorcing" his views on tapering from his decisions on when to hike rates.
5:42 a.m. Aug. 10, 2021 - By Victor Reklaitis
Infrastructure bill looks set to pass Senate without changes sought by crypto advocatesA $1 trillion bipartisan infrastructure bill on Tuesday appeared on track to pass the Senate without changes sought by the cryptocurrency industry's supporters, as a deal among key senators on an amendment didn't get support from the full chamber. On Monday afternoon, the on the infrastructure bill's new tax-reporting requirement for bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies, saying they would push to pass their compromise amendment through a process known as unanimous consent that makes quick approvals possible, but the deal didn't win unanimous support in the Senate later Monday. "The prospects look slim" for achieving unanimous consent "as the Senate is scheduled to vote on the infrastructure bill at 11:00 a.m. today," said Height Capital Markets analyst Edwin Groshans in a note on Tuesday. The infrastructure bill then heads to the House of Representatives, where Groshans predicts that any attempt to amend the bill's crypto provision "will meet the same fate as the Senators' effort."
3:26 a.m. July 23, 2021 - By Tomi Kilgore
More homes for sale will see price declines in coming weeks, Redfin saidReal estate brokerage Redfin Corp. said Friday that it expects more homes for sale will suffer price declines in the coming weeks, as supply starts to pile up and pending sales continue to decline. "Just as buyers are pulling back, more listings are hitting the market," said Redfin Chief Economist Daryl Fairweather. "I'm optimistic this will create conditions for a little bit of rain in this inventory drought. A homeowner who is thinking of selling to buy again is going to have a much easier time now than they would have back in March." Pending home sales for the four-week period ending July 18 were up 9% from the year-ago period, Redfin said, but that was the smallest increase since the four-week period ending June 28, 2020. The company said 55% of homes sold above list price during the period, up from 29% a year ago, but Redfin said that measure is "plateauing," as it has been at 54%-55% since the four-week period ending June 27. The SPDR S&P Homebuilders ETF has lost 3.2% over the past three months, while the S&P 500 has gained 4.5%.
4:51 p.m. May 25, 2021 - By Quentin Fottrell
Why are ‘Karens’ so angry? Such incidents have not gone away. Instead, they’ve become another depressingly ubiquitous feature of modern lifeSuch incidents have not gone away. Instead, they’ve become another depressingly ubiquitous feature of modern life.
3:37 a.m. May 18, 2021 - By Jacob Passy
Housing starts fall as builders contend with shortage of materials and laborU.S. home builders started construction on homes at a seasonally-adjusted annual rate of 1.57 million in April, representing a 9.5% decrease from the previous month's downwardly-revised figure, the U.S. Census Bureau . Compared with April 2020 though, housing starts were up 67%, though the year-over-year comparison is skewed somewhat by the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic's onset a year ago. The pace of permitting for new housing units increased again in March. Permitting for new homes occurred at a seasonally-adjusted annual rate of 1.76 million, up 0.3% from March and 61% from a year ago. Economists polled by MarketWatch had expected housing starts to occur at a pace of 1.70 million and building permits to come in at a pace of 1.77 million.
11:20 a.m. May 5, 2021 - By Greg Robb
Fed Vice Chairman Clarida says it is not time yet to talk about taperingFederal Reserve Vice Chairman Richard Clarida on Wednesday said it was not time yet to begin conversations about possibly scaling back the central bank's asset purchases. The Fed is buying $120 billion per month of Treasurys and mortgage-related securities as well as keeping interest rates close to zero in order to stimulate the economy. The Fed has said it wants to see "substantial further progress" on its goals of full employment and stable inflation before tapering. Asked when the Fed should start "talking about talking about" tapering, Clarida replied: "We don't think so right now." Dallas Fed President Robert Kaplan said earlier this week it was time to start the discussion about tapering. Several Fed officials speaking on Wednesday have all disagreed with Kaplan. "We'll get more data -and as we move through the year- we will be able to make a judgement on 'substantial further progress,' but we're not there yet," Clarida said.
4:30 a.m. May 5, 2021 - By Greg Robb
Fed's Evans says chances of persistently higher inflation are 'remote'The chances that the $2.8 trillion stimulus measures passed by Congress since December will overheat the economy and generate higher inflation are remote, said Chicago Fed President Charles Evans on Wednesday. Inflation is likely to pick up in coming months as people resume normal activities and some bottlenecks emerge but simulations performed by economists at the Chicago Fed see inflation topping out at less than a full percentage point and dissipating in two or three years, Evans said in a speech to the Levy Economics Institute of Bard College. "We still have some ways to go before we meet our goals" of full employment and stable 2% average inflation, Evans said. As a result, Fed policy "is likely on hold for some time," he added. Labor market conditions required to move interest rates off zero or to start to taper the $120 billion in monthly asset purchases "will not be met for a while," he said.
3:02 a.m. May 3, 2021 - Barrons.com
Stock Summer Swoon Coming?Deutsche Bank's Jim Reid discusses his firm's expectation for market volatility this summer and Mauricio Umansky, CEO of The Agency, analyzes the U.S. real estate market. Plus, Barron's Al Root and Carleton English preview upcoming earnings.
5:08 a.m. April 23, 2021 - By Andrea Riquier
Homebuilder ETFs jump on strong new-home sales dataExchange-traded funds with exposure to homebuilders, home renovation companies, and the residential real estate industry rallied Friday after a stronger-than-expected new-home sales report. Sales ran at a seasonally adjusted annual 1.02 million rate in March, the Commerce Department said. The SPDR S&P Homebuilders ETF gained 0.5%, and the iShares U.S. Home Construction ETF was up 0.3%. The Hoya Capital Housing ETF rose 0.1%. ETFs in this sector have surged since the start of the year, as the housing market stays hot and interest rates manageable for would-be buyers. XHB is up nearly 29% in 2021, and ITB has gained 28%.
5:08 a.m. April 23, 2021 - By Jacob Passy
New home sales soar to highest level since 2006New home sales occurred at a seasonally-adjusted annual rate of 1.021 million in March, the U.S. Census Bureau . It represented the fastest pace of new home sales since 2006. Month-over-month, sales rose 20.7%. Additionally, the Census Bureau revised the sales figure for February up to a rate of 846,000, from the originally reported rate of 775,000. The inventory of homes for sale at the end of March remained unchanged from the month prior, but was down 7% from a year ago.
5:07 a.m. April 22, 2021 - By Jacob Passy
Existing-home sales fall for second consecutive month as house prices surge to record levelsExisting-home sales declined in March, reflecting the challenges buyers continue to face in the competitive real-estate market. Existing home-sales fell 3.7% to a seasonally-adjusted, annual rate of 6.01 million in March, the National Association of Realtors . Compared with a year ago, home sales were up more than 12%. Home prices hit a high of $329,100, reflecting a record pace of price growth at 17.2% from last year.
6:55 a.m. April 16, 2021 - By Tomi Kilgore
Homebuilder stocks in broad rally to records after big jump in housing starts dataThe homebuilder sector enjoyed a unanimous rally toward a record Friday, after surged more than expected. the SPDR S&P Homebuilders ETF rallied 1.6% toward a record close, with all 35 equity components gaining ground. Among the more active homebuilders, shares of Toll Brothers Inc. climbed 1.9% and D.R. Horton Inc. hiked up 2.3%, both into record territory, while Lennar Corp. advanced 1.0%, in range of its April 9 record close of $105.52. Also in the homebuilders ETF, shares of Home Depot Inc. rallied 1.3% and Lowe's Companies jumped 1.5%, both toward record closes. The homebuilders ETF has run up 29.6% year to date, while the S&P 500 has gained 11.2%. Housing starts in March rose 19% from February to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 1.74 million, topping expectations of 1.62 million.
7:26 a.m. April 9, 2021 - By Michael Ashbaugh
Charting a Farewell Focus: 10-year yield asserts the range, Semiconductor sector presses record highs, TNX, SMH, KLAC, ROST, FOUR, ZENThis is the final edition of The Technical Indicator on MarketWatch. As its founder, and continuous editor since 2003, it has been a blast publishing for engaged and knowledgable readers for nearly 18 years.
7:12 a.m. April 8, 2021 - By Michael Ashbaugh
Bullish momentum persists: S&P 500 (slightly) extends April breakout Focus: Communications services sector tags record highs, Apple’s stealth trendline breakout, XLC, AAPL, IBM, ON, NUANU.S. stocks are mixed early Thursday, vacillating ahead of scheduled remarks from the Federal Reserve Chairman. Against this backdrop, the S&P 500 has tagged its latest record high, though narrowly, while the Nasdaq Composite has extended an already-aggressive trendline breakout.
6:58 a.m. April 7, 2021 - By Michael Ashbaugh
Bull trend confirmed: S&P 500 tags technical target (4,085) Focus: Europe digests break to 12-year highs, IEV, ASML, ADI, EMR, YUMU.S. stocks are mixed early Wednesday, vacillating ahead of the release of the Federal Reserve’s meeting minutes, due out this afternoon. Against this backdrop, the S&P 500 and Dow industrials are digesting decisive breaks to record territory, while the Nasdaq Composite has sustained an aggressive trendline breakout.
7:55 a.m. April 6, 2021 - By Michael Ashbaugh
Charting a bullish technical tilt, S&P 500 extends break atop 4,000 mark Focus: Consumer staples sustain break to record territory, XLP, VMW, ADSK, LUV, DLTRTechnically speaking, the major U.S. benchmarks have taken flight to start April, rising amid statistically unusual bullish momentum, writes Michael Ashbaugh.
7:33 a.m. April 6, 2021 - By Michael Ashbaugh
Charting a bullish technical tilt, S&P 500 extends break atop 4,000 mark Focus: Consumer staples sustain break to record territory, XLP, VMW, ADSK, LUV, DLTR Technically speaking, the major U.S. benchmarks have taken flight to start April, rising amid statistically unusual bullish momentum. In the process, the S&P 500 and Dow Jones Industrial Average have knifed to record highs, while the Nasdaq Composite has staged a potentially consequential trendline breakout.
7:13 a.m. April 5, 2021 - By Michael Ashbaugh
Charting bullish follow-through, S&P 500 knifes atop 4,000 mark Focus: 2021 currency trends persist, U.S. dollar retests 200-day average, Alphabet tags record high, UUP, FXE, GOOGL, QRVO, SEDG, HESU.S. stocks are firmly higher early Monday, rising after a strong batch of economic data. Against this backdrop, the S&P 500 has extended an April break atop the marquee 4,000 mark, while the Nasdaq Composite has reclaimed a key trendline, rising to place distance atop its 50-day moving average.
7:02 a.m. April 1, 2021 - By Michael Ashbaugh
Charting a bullish Q2 start, S&P 500 tags the 4,000 mark Focus: Semiconductor sector reclaims key resistance, SMH, LRCX, NTAP, MSI, NOVAU.S. stocks are firmly higher early Thursday, rising amid a largely bullish April start. Against this backdrop, the S&P 500 has ventured atop the 4,000 mark for the first time on record, as the Nasdaq Composite vies to simply reclaim its 50-day moving average, currently 13,427.
5:06 a.m. April 1, 2021 - By Jeffry Bartash
U.S. construction spending drops 0.8% in FebruaryU.S. spending on construction projects slipped 0.8% in February to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of $1.52 trillion, the Commerce Department said Thursday. Economists polled by Dow Jones and The Wall Street Journal had expected a 1% decline, largely because of a severe bout of bad weather in states such as Texas that disrupted construction. Residential construction dipped 0.2% in February, while spending on public construction projects fell a larger 1.3%. Construction spending is still up 5.3% over the past year, however, and it's expected to bounce back quickly in the spring as the economy strengthens.
7:03 a.m. March 31, 2021 - By Michael Ashbaugh
Charting a stealth breakout attempt, S&P 500 tags fractional record high Focus: 10-year yield asserts higher plateau, FedEx extends earnings-fueled breakout, TNX, FDX, X, APD, VCELU.S. stocks are higher early Wednesday, rising as a largely-bullish first quarter concludes. Against this backdrop, the S&P 500 has tagged a fractional record high early Wednesday amid a stealth late-March breakout attempt that remains underway.
7:43 a.m. March 30, 2021 - By Michael Ashbaugh
Charting the S&P 500’s approach of the 4,000 mark Focus: Basic materials stage bull-flag breakout, Boeing digests rally to 52-week highs, XLB, BA, TGT, FFIV, TXTechnically speaking, the S&P 500 has sustained a reversal from major support, rising to challenge record highs, and within striking distance of the marquee 4,000 mark, writes Michael Ashbaugh.
7:15 a.m. March 30, 2021 - By Michael Ashbaugh
Charting the S&P 500’s approach of the 4,000 mark Focus: Basic materials stage bull-flag breakout, Boeing digests rally to 52-week highs, XLB, BA, TGT, FFIV, TXTechnically speaking, the U.S. benchmarks’ bigger-picture backdrop remains bullish, on balance, though the prevailing market technicals are not one-size-fits-all. Amid the cross currents, the S&P 500 has sustained a bullish reversal from major support, rising to challenge record highs, and within striking distance of the marquee 4,000 mark.
7:26 a.m. March 29, 2021 - By Michael Ashbaugh
Charting market cross currents: S&P 500 pulls in from record close Focus: Consumer staples and real estate sectors break out, XLP, IYR, TXN, NXPI, KOU.S. stocks are lower early Monday, pressured partly amid concerns that a hedge fund’s forced liquidation may have adverse ripple effects. Against this backdrop, the S&P 500 and Dow industrials have pulled in from their latest record close, even as the Nasdaq Composite vies to simply maintain major support matching the 2020 peak (12,973).
12:23 p.m. March 25, 2021 - By Andrew Keshner
Real-estate agents are rethinking decades of advice on pools and how COVID-19 rewrote American shopping lists Thursday’s Personal Finance Stories Thursday’s Personal Finance StoriesThursday’s Personal Finance Stories.
9:06 a.m. March 24, 2021 - By Greg Robb
Fed's Williams doesn't expect inflation pressures building over next couple of yearsThe U.S. economy will recover "really nicely" over the next couple of years, but this doesn't mean inflation pressures will build, said New York Fed President John Williams on Wednesday. "I don't see inflationary pressures really building during that time," Williams said during a webinar sponsored by Syracuse University. He noted that inflation rates around the world are very low. In addition, there are still 9 million fewer jobs in the U.S. economy than at the start of the pandemic. If inflation does surprise to the upside, the Fed has the tools to get inflation down near the Fed's 2% annual goal, Williams said.
Browse topics:

Filter results by

Location

Us (392)

Asia Pacific (27)

Europe (20)

China (18)

Japan (17)

Eu (16)

Link to MarketWatch's Slice.